Women and Leadership

Front Cover
Caroline Sweetman
Oxfam, 2000 - Social Science - 86 pages
In no country do women participate in political leadership on a par with men. Lack of a voice at all levels of decisionmaking in societies worldwide perpetuates women's poverty and marginalization. The contributors to this book discuss women's own strategies for ensuring gender parity in government and NGOs, including leadership training; the need for women's leadership of the institutions which distribute resources for development, so they reflect a commitment to gender equity; women's leadership in resisting exploitation in the workplace; and challenges faced by female heads of households, whose lack of a voice in community-level decisionmaking deepens their economic poverty.
Contributors include Lesley Abdela, Peggy Antrobus, David Kelleher, and Aruna Rao
 

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Page 10 - She must be educated to want a better home, better furnishings, better food, better water supplies, etc., and if she wants them she will want them for her children. In short, the sustained effort from the male will only come when the woman is educated to the stage when her wants are never satisfied. In a selected area of Kenya a deliberate policy — possibly best described as "keeping up with the Jones's" — was adopted, by trying to create female competition and jealousy.
Page 3 - Achieving the goal of equal participation of women and men in decision-making will provide a balance that more accurately reflects the composition of society and is needed in order to strengthen democracy and promote its proper functioning.
Page 70 - Article 2 Communications may be submitted by or on behalf of individuals or groups of individuals, under the jurisdiction of a State Party, claiming to be victims of a violation of any of the rights set forth in the Convention by that. State Party. Where a communication is submitted on behalf of individuals or groups of individuals, this shall be with their consent unless the author can justify acting on their behalf without such consent.
Page 48 - Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London El 4NS, UK...
Page 67 - ... ensure that laws against family violence and abuse, rape, sexual assault and other gender-based violence give adequate protection to all women, and respect their integrity and dignity. Appropriate protective and support services should be provided for victims. Gender-sensitive training of judicial and law enforcement officers and other public officials is essential for the effective implementation of the Convention...
Page 67 - The Convention in article 1 defines discrimination against women. The definition of discrimination includes gender-based violence, that is, violence that is directed against a woman because she is a woman or that affects women disproportionately. It includes acts that inflict physical, mental or sexual harm or suffering, threats of such acts, coercion and other deprivations of liberty.
Page 53 - Earlier at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), held in Cairo in September 1994...
Page 50 - The following decade, nationwide preparations for the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing in 1995...
Page 67 - ... includes gender-based violence, that is, violence that is directed against a woman because she is a woman or that affects women disproportionately. It includes acts that inflict physical, mental or sexual harm or suffering, threats of such acts, coercion and other deprivations of liberty. Gender-based violence may breach specific provisions of the Convention, regardless of whether those provisions expressly mention violence.
Page 3 - ... condition for women's interests to be taken into account. Without the active participation of women and the incorporation of women's perspective at all levels of decision-making, the goals of equality, development and peace cannot be achieved. 182. Despite the widespread movement towards democratization in most countries, women are largely underrepresented at most levels of government, especially in ministerial and other executive bodies, and have made little progress in attaining political power...

About the author (2000)

Caroline Sweetman is Editor of the international journal Gender & Development and works for Oxfam GB.