Women in Islam and the Middle East: a reader

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I.B. Tauris, May 15, 2008 - Political Science - 293 pages
Much of the lively and often heated debate on the role of women in Islam and Middle Eastern society is grounded in different readings of the primary Arabic, Persian, Turkish and other sources and historical precedents. These key texts remain inaccessible to English-speaking readers. Women in Islam and the Middle East fills this gap by gathering material concerning women in Islam from a wide range of sources, dating from the early Islamic period to the present day. The readings cover various aspects of women's experience: legal, domestic, political, religious and cultural, and are accompanied by introductions that explain the background of each source and discuss some of the questions raised. Bibliographies direct readers to additional material. This reader has been compiled with both undergraduate and graduate students in mind, but it will also be of interest to anyone concerned with issues of gender and Islamism.

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Foundations of Islam
25
Early Islamic History
75
Women as Sources Actors and Subjects of Islamic Law
93
A Legal Guide
103
Must Viziers and Judges be Men?
112
Womens Roles In Medieval Society
115
Dangerous Precedents
117
Juha and his Wife Aisha and her Husband
168
TwentiethCentury Vicissitudes
181
Historical Statistics on Education
183
Womens Autobiographies
195
An Early Public Lecture on Womens Liberation
213
The Feminist Movement
226
The Story of a Contemporary Woman Mystic
237
Fatima Empowered A Covenant for Islamic Resistance
255

Devout Women
128
Medieval Learned Women
131
Economic Transactions
135
Endowment Documents
140
Islamic Views on Sexuality
159
A Daughter of the Galilee Challenges Men
262
Women and Islam in the Twentyfirst Century
265
Index
287
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Ruth Roded is Senior Lecturer in the History of Islam and the Middle East at the Institute of African and Asian Studies, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

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