Women in Ancient America

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University of Oklahoma Press, 1999 - Social Science - 343 pages
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This first comprehensive work on women in precolumbian American cultures describes gender roles and relationships in North, Central, and South America from 12,000 B.C. to the 1500s A.D. Utilizing many key archaeological works, Karen Olsen Bruhns and Karen E. Stothert redress some of the long-standing male bias in writing about ancient Native American lifeways.

Bruhns and Stothert focus on several of the most thought-provoking areas of study in the Americas: the origins of agriculture, the development of complex societies, the evolution of religious systems, and the interpretation of art and mortuary materials. The authors pay particular attention to the problems of interpreting archaeological remains and the uses of historic and ethnographic evidence in reconstructing the past.

 

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Contents

Women and Gender
3
The First Women in America
26
Women in the Archaic
49
Women and Food Production
76
Women in Households
103
apartment compound
132
Women Production and Specialization
139
Ecuador
142
of Cuauhtemoc to Cortes
236
Coya traveling
243
Women War and Conquest
246
3ab Vanquished warrior queen of Cacaxtla
254
abusing a woman weaver
269
Women in Prehistory
274
Glossary
283
Notes on Main References
291

6ab Maya woman scribe and Aztec woman scribe
164
Women and Religion
167
in a building
202
Women and Power
214
Bibliography
305
Sources of Figures
333
Index
337
Copyright

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References to this book

Ungendering Civilization
K. Anne Pyburn
No preview available - 2004
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About the author (1999)

Karen Olsen Bruhns is Professor Emerita of Anthropology at San Francisco State University and author of Ancient South America.

Karen E. Stothert is Anthropology Research Associate at the University of Texas, San Antonio, and author of more than 75 monographs and scientific papers based on her own anthropological and archaeological research.

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