Women's History as Scientists: A Guide to the Debates

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ABC-CLIO, 2003 - Reference - 252 pages
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This remarkable work illuminates the debates surrounding women's involvement with science throughout history, covering a broad range of disciplines. Unlike a biographical compendium of great scientists, it examines the question posed throughout history: Are women capable of doing science? Whether people have the right to even ask the question is germane to the debate itself.

The coverage discusses Hypatia, the first female scientist about whom we have information; examines the contradictory behavior of the church in the treatment of women during the medieval era; and covers the 17th century debates over women's education. It examines women physicians, discusses feminism and science, and delves into why there are so few women in science--even today. The debate that began during the time of Plato and Aristotle continues to this day.

 

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Contents

II
1
III
21
IV
41
V
61
VI
81
VII
99
VIII
117
IX
139
X
161
XI
183
XII
205
XIII
215
XIV
233
XV
253
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Leigh Whaley is assistant professor of history at Acadia University, Wolfville, NS, Canada.

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