Women's Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation

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Cambridge University Press, May 27, 1999 - Literary Criticism - 300 pages
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The growth of female reading audiences from the mid-eighteenth century to the early Victorian era represents both a vital episode in women's history and a highly significant factor in shaping the literary production of the period. This book offers the first broad overview and detailed analysis of this growing readership, its representation in literature, and its influence. Jacqueline Pearson examines both historical women readers, including Laetitia Pilkington, Elizabeth Carter, Frances Burney and Jane Austen, and a wide range of texts in which the figure of the woman reader is important.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Richardson Johnson and Byron
22
2 What should girls and women read?
42
3 The pleasures and perils of reading
87
some case histories
122
5 Where and how should women read?
152
class gender reading
176
women and novelreading
196
Conclusion
219
Notes
221
Select bibliography
260
Index
285
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