Women's Life in Greece and Rome: A Source Book in Translation

Front Cover
JHU Press, Aug 23, 2005 - History - 420 pages
1 Review

This highly acclaimed collection provides a unique look into the public and private lives and legal status of Greek and Roman women of all social classes-from wet nurses, prostitutes, and gladiatrixes to poets, musicians, intellectuals, priestesses, and housewives. The third edition adds new texts to sections throughout the book, vividly describing women's sentiments and circumstances through readings on love, bereavement, and friendship, as well as property rights, breast cancer, female circumcision, and women's roles in ancient religions, including Christianity and pagan cults.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pandoragreen - LibraryThing

I really enjoyed reading through this. A wonderful collection of source material. They let the sources speak for themselves. Well organized, with useful notes. Read full review

Contents

WOMENS VOICES Female poets
1
Sappho
2
Anactoria
3
Remembering the girl Atthis
4
Reflections on a woman poet
5
Two epigrams for Baucis
6
Thersis g 15 Philaenis
7
To Messala
8
Education of females 213 The education of Eurydice
166
Intellectual life 216 Platos female pupils
167
Epigram on Hipparchia
168
A philosopher
169
Sayings attributed to Aspasia by Socrates
170
Going to a festival
172
The gobetween
174
Lesbians as a bad omen
175

Claudia Trophime
9
Caecilia Trebulla
10
Andromaches ideal behaviour
11
Deianeira contrasts childhood with life after marriage
12
Pasiphae 34 In defence of women
13
A fragment of a comedy
14
MENS OPINIONS Praise Inscriptions 36 Archedice
16
Eucharis
17
Pythion and Epicydilla
18
From the tomb of the Statilii 46 Epitaph for a little girl Politta 47 Allia Potestas
19
Athenodora
20
Macria Helike a Christian
21
Tiberius chooses to die in place of Cornelia
22
Pandora
23
How to pick a wife
24
The nature of women
25
The best days in a womans life
27
The uselessness of women
28
Satire and irony
29
The price of a wife
30
The dangers of literacy
31
Bereavement
34
PHILOSOPHERS ON THE ROLE OF WOMEN 72 The female role
38
Educating women to make them more like men
41
Men and women should be treated alike
47
The home
48
A Roman philosopher advocates womens education
50
LEGAL STATUS IN THE GREEK WORLD Crete 76 Laws relating to women
55
Funeral law
58
The banker Pasions will
59
Provisions for female children
61
Married heiresses
62
Property
64
A mistresss scheme
65
A husbands defence
66
The case for the prosecution in a poisoning trial
71
The past activities of a courtesan
73
A mortgage
82
Security for a dowry
83
Opinions attributed to the sophist Gorgias
84
The advantages of Spartan education and marriage customs
85
Anecdotes
87
The behaviour of Etruscan women
88
A marriage contract
89
Annulment of a marriage contract
91
Problems over a dowry
92
LEGAL STATUS IN THE ROMAN WORLD Early Rome 107 The laws of the kings
94
The Twelve Tables excerpts
95
Husbands punishment of wives
96
Punishment for adultery
97
On womens status within the family
98
Patria potestas and adoption
99
Patria potestas
100
Pregnancy status and paternity
101
Children of slaves
102
Men must marry
103
The consequences of adultery
104
Petitions to the emperor
105
Concubinage
107
The right of life and death
108
Social status and marriage
109
Social status
110
On marriage
111
Marital subordination
112
Social status and citizenship of children
114
Conditions for the dissolution of marriage
115
On legal powers of women
116
The husbands liability
117
Prostitution
118
How a woman loses her social status
119
A final dowry payment
120
Dowry payment through a bank
121
A mothers last will and testament
122
Calpurnia Heraclea a woman landowner
123
A womans petition to act without a kyrios
124
A prostitute and her mother
125
A woman greengrocer brings a charge
126
A wifes complaint against an abusive husband
127
PUBLIC LIFE Womens bravery in legend and history Legend
129
Marpessa and the defence of Tegea
130
Cloelia the hostage
131
The rape of Lucretia
132
History
133
Women who risked their lives to save their husbands
134
A funeral eulogy
135
Pythias a courageous slavewoman
139
OnArria
140
Arrias death
141
Political life 173 Women demonstrate and obtain repeal of the Oppian law
142
Sempronia a revolutionary
147
Hortensias speech
149
Caenis concubine of the Emperor Vespasian
151
Electioneering
152
The family of Julia Domna
153
Womens organisations 181 A trade union?
155
The curia of women
156
A meeting of married women
157
Honorific inscriptions 191 The chaste Ase
158
Food for children
159
Junia Theodora
160
Scholasticia
161
From the Panathenaic victor lists
162
PRIVATE LIFE Correct behaviour 208 Chastity
163
Greek and Roman customs compared
164
Imperial upbringing
165
A letter from a soldiers wife
176
Birth control
178
Disadvantages of a liberal education
179
Melite
180
A butcher and his wife
181
Advice on marriage
182
To Calpurnia Hispulla
184
To his wife Calpurnia
185
To Calpurnia
186
Exposure of a female child
187
Graxia who nursed her own children
188
Parents and children 254 Posilla Senenia
190
Cornelias children
191
Seneca to his mother
192
The death of the Helvidiae
193
The death of Minicia Marcella
194
Julia daughter of Augustus
195
How to train a wife
196
Letter from a woman about domestic matters
203
Attempts to explain Roman marriage customs
204
A wedding invitation
205
Bitte
206
From the second husband
207
OCCUPATIONS Apprenticeship 283 An apprenticeship agreement
208
Valeria Maxima owner of a farm
209
The trial of the hetaera Phryne of Thespiae
210
Justinian on pimps
211
Vibia Calybenis the procuress
212
Graffiti
213
Lady gladiators
214
Septimius Severus calls a halt
215
A tumbler
216
An actress
217
Phoebe Vocontia
218
Handiwork
219
A grocer
220
Inscriptions
221
Women in the service of the imperial household
222
Occupations in Roman Athens
224
MEDICINE AND ANATOMY Philosophers observe nature 338 Origins of the desire for procreation
225
The female role in generation
226
Menstruation
229
Writings of practising physicians The Hippocratic Corpus
230
A contraceptive
233
Displacement of the womb
237
Hysterical suffocation
238
Dislocation of the womb
239
Dropsy in the womb
240
The dangerous periods during pregnancy
241
Hysteria in virgins
242
Case histories
243
Psychological origins of hysteria
246
Aretaeus of Cappadocia
248
Inflammation of the womb
249
Soranus
250
instructions for the midwife
255
Treatment for hysterical suffocation
256
Writings on medical matters by laymen 358 The women of Miletus a traditional story
259
Treatments for diseases of the womb
260
The dangers of sharing a bath with women
262
Case histories from inscriptions 363 Epitaph for a woman who died while pregnant
263
Socratea
264
Four doctors
265
A midwife and physician
266
Epitaphs of midwives
267
Advice on hiring a wetnurse
268
Two contracts for wetnurses for slave children
270
Receipt of wages for nursing
272
RELIGION DionysusBacchus 383 Imported Phrygian rituals
273
Epitaph for a priestess
274
Senatus consultum de bacchanalibus
275
Rules in the cult of Dionysus
276
Chrysis priestess of Hera
277
The story of Persephone
278
Thesmophoria
280
Regulations for women attending the festival of Demeter
281
The priestess and temple of Athena Nike
282
A puberty ritual
283
Offerings to Artemis at Brauron
284
Dedication of statues of women
285
A petition to Ptolemy and Cleopatra
287
Vestal Virgins
288
Vestal Virgins
290
Augustus and the Vestal Virgins
291
Desecration of the rites of the Bona Dea
292
Medea
294
A love potion
295
Bittos curse
296
Epitaph with a curse
298
A curse against Aristocydes
299
Mamia
300
Priestesses at the sanctuary of Hilaeira and Phoebe
301
Tullia priestess of Hestia
302
Cassia Victoria
303
A priestess of Demeter at Eleusis
304
Christianity
307
The martyrdom of St Perpetua
313
Gnostic ritual
323
Late pagan saints
331
Abbreviations
360
Appendix to the third edition
367
Geographical and chronological concordance
400
Index of women and goddesses
407
General index
414
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2005)

Mary R. Lefkowitz is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in Humanities emerita at Wellesley. Maureen B. Fant is an independent writer and scholar living in Rome.

Bibliographic information