Women's Roles in the Renaissance

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2005 - Social Science - 335 pages
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For the first time, a content-rich survey on Renaissance women for students and the general public is available. The story of the Renaissance has usually been told from the elite male perspective. Here, the lives of women and girls from a wide range of classes, religions, and countries in Europe take center stage. Women had a significant impact on the economy, social structures, and the culture of the Renaissance, despite the constraints on their exercise of power, lack of opportunities, enforced dependence, and exclusion from politics, government, science, law, banking, and more. Women's Roles in the Renaissance examines the attitudes and practices that shaped the varied roles of women then, but also the important ways women shaped the world in which they lived. The focus is on both the ideas that circulated about women and on the difference between representations of them and their everyday life experiences.

The narrative draws from a wide variety of sources on every aspect of women's lives. Narrative topical chapters cover women and education, the law, work, politics, religion, literature, the arts, and pleasures. Numerous women are profiled, and a plethora of quotations and examples of their work provides a sense of their spirit. Many period illustrations are included that highlight the text. This will prove to be a most valuable one-volume resource on a high-interest topic.

 

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Contents

VI
27
VII
53
VIII
89
IX
125
X
153
XI
195
XII
241
XIII
277
XV
303
XVI
321
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Page 19 - For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, forasmuch as he is the image and glory of God : but the woman is the glory of the man.
Page 19 - Let your women keep silence in the churches : for it is not permitted unto them to speak ; but they are commanded to be under obedience, as also saith the law.
Page 19 - Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head of the church : and he is the saviour of the body. Therefore as the church is subject unto Christ, so let the wives be to their own husbands in every thing.
Page 20 - For Adam was first formed, then Eve. And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression.
Page 19 - But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence.

About the author (2005)

Meg Lota Brown is Professor of English at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

Kari Boyd McBride is Associate Professor and Undergraduate Director in the Women's Studies Department, Faculty Affiliate in the Department of English, and Director of the Group for Early Modern Studies at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

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