Wood's Medical and surgical monographs, Volume 5

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William Wood, 1890
 

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Page 365 - Physician, Late Senior Physician, to the Royal Hospital for Diseases of the Chest, London, THE INITIAL STAGES OF CONSUMPTION. CHAPTER I. IN the commencement of the American Civil War, the North was stirred to its core by the following...
Page 618 - The" all but unanimous conviction of the most experienced observers in different parts of the world is quite opposed to the belief that leprosy is contagious, or communicable by proximity or contact with the diseased.
Page 530 - ... child, after a labour in all respects natural, and, having weaned the child, she menstruated with moderate regularity up to 1874. From the beginning of January, 1875, her menstruation ceased, and she believed herself to be in the family way, early in March she was about two months pregnant, whilst washing she was suddenly seized with violent pain in the right side of the belly, which caused her to faint, she was taken to bed, and her ordinary medical attendant was sent for, she was suffering...
Page 888 - ... and another, connected with the copper of the first cell, was placed in the sulphate of copper immediately under the diaphragm which separated the two solutions. The circuit conducted very readily, and the action was very energetic. Hydrogen was given off at the platinode in a solution of potassa, and oxygen at the zincode in the sulphate of copper.
Page 486 - Even phthisis now counts its many cures ; but here is an accident which may happen to any wife in the most useful period of her existence, which good authorities have said is never cured ; and for which even in this age, when science and art boast of such high attainments, no remedy, either medical or surgical, has been tried with a single success. From the middle of the eleventh century when Albucasis described the first known case of extrauterine pregnancy, men have doubtless watched the life ebb...
Page 484 - I carefully examined the specimen which was removed, and I found that if I had tied the broad ligament, and removed the ruptured tube, I should have completely arrested the hemorrhage, and I now believe that had I done this the patient's life would have been saved.
Page 563 - The uterus was displaced to the left side of a two months' pregnancy. From the history of five months' amenorrhoea, and the occasional attacks of fainting and pain during that time, there was no difficulty in coming to the conclusion that we had here to deal with an extra-uterine gestation developing between the layers of the broad ligament. Two days after, the patient collapsed markedly, evidently from rupture of the sac and loss of blood. Eight hours afterward, when she had somewhat rallied, an...
Page 584 - About that time the physician was summoned, not on account of labor pains, as she never had them, but on account of excessive and painful movements of the child. These were always very marked, and caused her the utmost inconvenience. As she expressed it, she felt more life with this child in two hours than during her entire previous pregnancy. October 13th the physician was again summoned for the same reason as before. At this time 'something was rubbed on the abdomen,' after which the movements...
Page 413 - This depressant influence seems to be exerted through the medium of cardio-inhibitory mechanism. 11. The toxic action of the product is more or less completely opposed by atropine. 12. The amount of the product which may be separated appears to bear a distinct relation to the abundance of the bacillar elements present. 13. Absorption of the poisonous product most probably occurs by way of the lymphatic circulation.
Page 543 - If the child is still alive and near the full term, I believe it to be our duty to operate. If the child is dead, the propriety of operating seems to me quite evident, though it has been disputed by so eminent an authority as Mr. Jonathan Hutchinson. Of course no strict rule can be laid down, and each case must be decided on its own merits; but the records of surgery are so full of instances of the risks which such cases have to run when suppuration of the sac occurs, as it almost always does some...

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