The Woods ; Lakeboat ; Edmond: Three Plays

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Grove Press, 1987 - Drama - 298 pages
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"The Woods," described by the Chicago Daily News as a “beautifully conceived love story,” is a modern dramatic parable in which a young man and woman who spend a night in his family’s cabin experience passion, then disillusionment, but are in the end reconciled by mutual need.

In "Lakeboat," eight crew members aboard a merchant ship exchange their wild fantasies about sex, gambling, and violence.

In "Edmond," a man set morally adrift leaves an unfulfilling marriage to find sex, adventure, companionship, and, ultimately, the meaning of his existence.

Of The Woods, Richard Eder of The New York Times wrote that Mamet’s “language has never been so precise, pure, and affecting.”

Michael Feingold in The Village Voice praised "Lakeboat" for its “richly overheard talk and its loopy, funny construction.”

Jack Kroll of Newsweek called "Edmond" “a riveting theatrical experience that illuminates the heart of darkness.”

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About the author (1987)

David Mamet, November 30, 1947 - David Mamet was born on November 30, 1947 in Flossmoor, Illinois. He attended Goddard College in Vermont and the Neighborhood Playhouse School of Theater in New York. He began his career as an actor and a director, but soon turned to playwriting. He won acclaim in 1976 with three Off-Broadway plays, "The Duck Variations," "Sexual Perversity in Chicago" and "American Buffalo." His work became known for it's strong male characters and the description of the decline of morality in the world. In 1984, Mamet received the Pulitzer Prize in Literature for his play, "Glengarry Glen Ross." In 1981, before he received the Pulitzer, Mamet tried his hand at screenwriting. he started by adapting "The Postman Always Rings Twice," and then adapting his own "Glengarry Glen Ross" as well as writing "The Untouchables" and Wag the Dog." He also taught at Goddard College, Yale Drama School and New York University. Mamet won the Jefferson Award in 1974, the Obie Award in 1976 and 1983, the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1977 and 1984, the Outer Circle Award in 1978, the Society of West End Theater Award in 1983, The Pulitzer Prize in 1984, The Dramatists Guild Hall-Warriner Award in 1984, and American Academy Award in 1986 and a Tony Award in 1987. He is considered to be one of the greatest artists in his field.

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