Woodward's Country Homes

Front Cover
G. Woodward, 1869 - Country homes - 188 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 103 - Built in the old Colonial day, When men lived in a grander way, With ampler hospitality ; A kind of old Hobgoblin Hall, Now somewhat fallen to decay, With weather-stains upon the wall, And stairways worn, and crazy doors, And creaking and uneven floors, And chimneys huge, and tiled and tall.
Page 158 - HOMES. wall plate, 2 by 4 inches, is laid flat on top of the studding, and nailed to each stud ; the rafters are then put on ; they are notched, allowing the ends to project outside for cornice, &c. The bearing of each rafter comes directly over the top of each stud, and is nailed to it.
Page 90 - It is the duty of teachers, as well as parents and school committees, to see that the circumstances under which children study are such as shall leave a happy impression upon their minds ; for whatever is brought under the frequent observation of the young must have its influence upon their susceptible natures for good or evil. Shabby school houses induce slovenly habits. Ill-constructed benches may not only distort the body, but, by reflex influence, the mind as well. Conditions like these sel...
Page 15 - ... resembles them, of his own. To begin at the beginning, I will suppose such a man, as either of these, in search of land to purchase and build upon. His means are moderate. Leaving the climate and productiveness of soil out of the question, the main things to find united are shade, water, and inequality of surface. With these three features given by Nature, any spot may be made beautiful, and at very little cost ; and, fortunately for purchasers in this country, most land is valued and sold with...
Page 163 - The weight and power necessary to injure a building with 3 by 8 studding, with a double row of bridging, is more than is ever practically applied to any storehouse. The lining of a balloon frame adds immensely to its strength, particularly so if put on diagonally; it may be done outside or inside, though on the whole the inside is preferable. If done outside, it should be carried over the sill and nailed to it; the sill being wider than the studding, in order to get a larger bearing on the masonry,...
Page 151 - SOLON ROBINSON. In these days of BALLOONING, it is gratifying to know that there is one practically useful, well tested principle, which has risen above the character of an experiment, and is destined to hold an elevated position in the opinions of the masses. That principle is the one which is technically, as well as sarcastically, termed Balloon Framing, as applied to the construction of all classes of wooden buildings. The early history of the Balloon Frame, is somewhat obscure, there being no...
Page 156 - Stud. around the entire range of studding; below the ceiling line notch each stud one inch deep and four inches wide, and into this, flush with the inside face of the studding, nail an inch strip four inches wide. This notch may be cut before putting up the studs. If the frame be lined on the inside, it will not be necessary to notch the strip into the studs, but simply to nail it to the studding; the object of notching the studding is to...
Page 157 - ... building endways is in the direction of the fibre of the flooring, and sideways, as before stated, in the direction of the fibre of the joists. We have now reached the second floor. A third floor, if required, is put in in the same manner. Having reached the top of the building, each stud is sawed off to an equal height; if any are too short they are spliced by placing one on top of the other, and nailing a strip of inch board on both sides. The wall plate...
Page 163 - BO if put on diagonally ; it may be done outside or inside, though on the whole the inside is preferable, if done outside, it should be carried over the sill and nailed to it ; the sill being wider than the studding, in order to get a larger bearing on the masonry, and the floor joists being in the way, does not admit of inside lining being put on in the same manner. Close or continuous lining is not necessary for strength, but for dwelling houses adds much to the warmth.

Bibliographic information