Woodward's Country Homes

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G. Woodward, 1870 - Country homes - 188 pages
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Page 103 - Built in the old Colonial day, When men lived in a grander way, With ampler hospitality ; A kind of old Hobgoblin Hall, Now somewhat fallen to decay, With weather-stains upon the wall, And stairways worn, and crazy doors, And creaking and uneven floors, And chimneys huge, and tiled and tall.
Page 154 - ... we can so use our materials that every strain will come in the direction of the fibre of some portion of the wood work, we can make inch boards answer a better purpose than foot square beams, and this application of materials is one reason of the strength of Balloon Frames. The Balloon Frame belongs to no one person ; nobody claims it as an invention, and yet in the art of construction it is one of the most sensible improvements that has ever been made.
Page 154 - A man and a boy can now attain the same results, with ease, that twenty men could on an old-fashioned frame...
Page 154 - If, in erecting a building, we can so use our materials that every strain will come in the direction of the fibre of some portion of the wood work, we can make inch boards answer a better purpose than foot square beams, and this application of materials is one reason of the strength of Balloon Frames.
Page 90 - It is the duty of teachers, as well as parents and school committees, to see that the circumstances under which children study are such as shall leave a happy impression upon their minds ; for whatever is brought under the frequent observation of the young must have its influence upon their susceptible natures for good or evil. Shabby school houses induce slovenly habits. Ill-constructed benches may not only distort the body, but, by reflex influence, the mind as well. Conditions like these sel...
Page 164 - ... and the building warmer. Some line diagonally, say from center next the first floor towards extreme upper corners both ways ; others line one side diagonally in one direction, and the other in an opposite direction. This makes assurance of strength doubly sure. If lined inside, nail perpendicular lath to the lining 16 inches from centers, and on thia lath horizontally for plastering.
Page 155 - Frame" would convey a better impression, but the name " Balloon" has long ago outlived the derision which suggested it. The moment the foundation is prepared, and the bill of lumber on the ground, the balloon frame is ready to raise, and a man and boy can do all of it. The sills are generally 3 inches by 8 inches, halved at the ends or corners, and nailed together with large nails. Having laid the sills upon the foundation, the next thing in order is to put up the studding.
Page 15 - ... resembles them, of his own. To begin at the beginning, I will suppose such a man, as either of these, in search of land to purchase and build upon. His means are moderate. Leaving the climate and productiveness of soil out of the question, the main things to find united are shade, water, and inequality of surface. With these three features given by Nature, any spot may be made beautiful, and at very little cost ; and, fortunately for purchasers in this country, most land is valued and sold with...
Page 163 - The weight and power necessary to injure a building with 3 by 8 studding, with a double row of bridging, is more than is ever practically applied to any storehouse. The lining of a balloon frame adds immensely to its strength, particularly so if put on diagonally; it may be done outside or inside, though on the whole the inside is preferable. If done outside, it should be carried over the sill and nailed to it; the sill being wider than the studding, in order to get a larger bearing on the masonry,...
Page 156 - ... flush surface for lathing, as well as to form a shoulder or bearing necessary to sustain the second floor ; both of these are accomplished by lining inside the studding — (for small barns and out-buildings that do not require plastering, nail the strip 4 by 1, to the studding)— on this rests the joists of the second floor, the ends of which come flush to the outside face of the studding, and both ends of each joist are securely nailed to each stud ; the bearing of the joist on the inch strip...

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