Word, Text, Translation: Liber Amicorum for Peter Newmark

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Gunilla M. Anderman, Margaret Rogers
Multilingual Matters, 1999 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 240 pages
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This is a collection of essays from scholars in the field of Translation Studies throughout the world. The book ranges widely in subject matter, reflecting the diverse perspectives of Peter Newmark's interests in both literary and technical translation.
 

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Edited by: Professor Gunilla M. Anderman
Margaret Rogers (University of Surrey)
List price: 21.95 Discount: 20% Our Price: 17.56
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Format: Paperback (pp: xiii,240) ISBN: 1-85359-460-1
Publication date: 09 Sep 1999 13 Digit ISBN: 978-1-85359-460-1
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Summary:
As we enter the age of digital television with its potential offering of 500 channels, this volume addresses the implications of the rapidly changing television environment: for societies, for groups, for identities, for communication, for our sense of time, space, place, for education, for language, for genres, for our whole way of life.
Contents:
1. An interview with Peter Newmark, Monica Pedrola.
Part 1 Word:
2. The translator and the word: the pros and cons of dictionaries in translation, Janet Fraser' on the perils of particles translation, Gunilla Anderman.
3. Accuracy in translation, Viggo Hjornager Pedersen.
4. Friends, false friends and foes or back to basics in L1 and L2 translation, John M. Dodds.
5. Training translators in a "third language", Reiner Arntz.
Part 2 Context:
6. The role of contexts in translating, Eugene A. Nida.
7. Translation theory, translating theory and the sentence, Candance Seguinot, the ultimate comfort: word, text and the translation of tourist brochures, Mary Snell-Hornby.
8. Translating terms in text, Margaret Rogers.
Part 3 Text:
9. Words and texts: which are translated? a study in dialects, Albrecht Neubert.
10. Translating the introductory paragraph of Boris Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago, Jan Firbas.
11. Translating prismatic poetry, David Connolly.
12. How come the translation of a Limerick can have four lines (or can it?) Gideon Toury.
13. The source text in translation assessment, Gerald McAlester.
Part 4 And beyond:
14. Electronic corpora as tools for translation, Hans Lindquist.
15. The writing on the screen, Sylfest Lomheim.
16. Translating for children, Eithne O'Connell.
17. Translating and language games in the Balkans, Piotr Kuhiwezak.
18. ADNOM: a project that faded away, Patrick Chaffey.
19. From anonymous parasites to transformation agents, Simon S.C. Chau.
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Contents

Introduction
1
An Interview with Peter Newmark
17
Word
25
On the Perils of Particle Translation
35
Accuracy in Translation
47
Training Translators in a Third Language A New Approach
66
The Role of Contexts in Translating
79
Word Text and the Translation of Tourist
95
How Come the Translation of a Limerick Can Have Four Lines
157
Electronic Corpora as Tools for Translation
179
Translating for Children
208
ADNOM A Project that Faded Away
225
Contributors vii
253
The Sociology of Tourism
9
The Economics of Tourism
22
The Statistical Measurement of Tourism
55

Holding on to Some Slippery Customers
104
Words and Texts Which Are Translated? A Study in Dialectics
119
Odysseus Elytis and The Oxopetra
142
Still an Imbalance in Attention?
143
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About the author (1999)

Gunilla Anderman (? 2007) was Professor of Translation Studies at the University of Surrey where she taught translation theory, translation of drama and translation of children? s literature, fields in which she has published and lectured widely in the UK as well as internationally. She was also a professional translator with translations of Scandinavian plays staged in the UK, USA and South Africa. Her latest book is Europe on Stage: Translation and Theatre (2005). She was joint editor of the series Translating Europe.

Margaret Rogers is Professor of Translation and Terminology Studies and Director of the Centre for Translation Studies at the University of Surrey. She initiated the Terminology Network in the Institute of Translation and Interpreting, UK, and is a founder member of the Association of Terminology and Lexicography. She is a member of the Advisory Boards of Terminology, LSP and Professional Communication and Fachsprache as well as being a member of the Executive Board of the International Institute for Terminology Research.

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