Wordarrows: Native States of Literary Sovereignty

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U of Nebraska Press, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 164 pages
With wry humor and imaginative acuity, noted writer Gerald Vizenor offers compelling glimpses of modern Native American life and the different ways that Native Americans and whites interact, fight, and resolve their conflicts. The elusive borderland between white and Native American cultures is further complicated by exchanges of money, services, language, and skills that make up what Vizenor calls the ?new fur trade.? When Native Americans resist dominance, they fight back incisively and creatively with humor in the strategic word wars of survivance over victimry. Vizenor illuminates the troubling encounters and distant reaches of this modernist fur trade through his creative narratives. Especially memorable is the reincarnation of General George Custer as the head of Native American programs and the mystifying play of words between charity agencies and Native Americans. Several of Vizenor?s stories focus on a so-called urban reservation, Franklin Avenue in Minneapolis. In the last section Vizenor recalls his experiences and observations while reporting on the murder trial of a young Native American student, Thomas White Hawk, in South Dakota.
 

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Contents

Separatists behind the Blinds
9
Rattling Hail Ceremonial
18
Factors in the Urban Fur Trade
25
Roman Downwind
33
Laurel Hole In The Day
47
Baptiste Saint Simon
54
Custer on the Slipstream
65
Fruit Juice and Tribal Trickeries
75
Mother Earth Man and Paradise Flies
89
The Edible Menu and SlowFood Tricksters
104
Travels with Doctor Gerasimo
116
No Rest for the Good Sheriff
125
Daisie and Beacher on the Prairie
134
Word War in the Partsroom
143
Prosecutors and Prairie Fun Dancers
149
Copyright

Feeding the Reservation Mongrels
82

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About the author (2003)

Gerald Vizenor is a professor of American Studies and Native American literature at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of more than twenty books, including Fugitive Poses: Native American Indian Scenes of Absence and Presence and Manifest Manners: Narratives on Postindian Survivance, both published by the University of Nebraska Press.

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