Words Become Worlds: Semantic Studies of Genesis 1-11

Front Cover
BRILL, 1994 - Religion - 218 pages
By carefully analyzing the text-semantic features of the texts of Genesis 1-11, this book offers a quite new perspective on the primaeval history. The first part of the book examines Genesis 1-11, which is usually read as a creation story concerning the human being in relation to God, in which the human being falls from bad to worse. In these text-semantic studies it is shown that such is not the case, especially in the rather exciting analysis of the story of the Tower of Babel. In the second part of the book the methodological framework of these text-semantic studies is presented.
 

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Contents

The Serpent in Genesis
3
Man and Woman in the Garden of Eden
13
The Trees and yhwh God in Genesis
45
The Sons of God and the Daughters of Men in Genesis
63
Noah and God in Genesis
77
The Tower of Babel as Lookout over Genesis 111
91
A Semiotic Framework
119
Semantics and AnaLogic
149
From Text via Text to Meaning Intertextuality and
160
Exegesis in a Hermeneutical
200
Bibliography
211
Acknowledgements
217
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Ellen van Wolde, Th.D. (1989) in Biblical Studies, University of Nijmegen, is Professor of Old Testament Exegesis and Hebrew at the Tilburg University. She has published on Genesis, Job and Ruth, and on subjects of methodology and semiotics.

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