Words and Their Ways in English Speech

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User Review  - AlexTheHunn - LibraryThing

This is a fascinating lookt at linguistic oddities and how English is so irregular. Read full review

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Page 9 - Be taught, O faithful Consort, to control Rebellious passion ; for the Gods approve The depth, and not the tumult, of the soul ; A fervent, not ungovernable, love.
Page 217 - O ! let not virtue seek Remuneration for the thing it was ; For beauty, wit, High birth, vigour of bone, desert in service, Love, friendship, charity, are subjects all To envious and calumniating time. One touch of nature makes the whole world kin...
Page 11 - Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind. I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself And falls on the other.
Page 36 - For th' other, as great clerks have done. He could reduce all things to acts, And knew their natures by abstracts; Where Entity and Quiddity, The ghosts of defunct bodies, fly; Where truth in person does appear, Like words congeal'd in northern air.
Page 207 - Bring oil to fire, snow to their colder moods; Renege, affirm, and turn their halcyon beaks With every gale and vary of their masters, Knowing nought, like dogs, but following.
Page 366 - Tis unnatural, Even like the deed that's done. On Tuesday last A falcon towering in her pride of place Was by a mousing owl hawk'd at and kill'd.
Page 374 - And he lifted up his face to the window, and said, Who is on my side ? who ? And there looked out to him two or three eunuchs. And he said, Throw her down.
Page 147 - Twas English cut on Greek and Latin, Like fustian heretofore on satin; It had an odd promiscuous tone, As if h...
Page 63 - ... some of which are now struggling for the vogue, and others are in possession of it. I have done my utmost for some years past to stop the progress of mobb and banter, but have been plainly borne down by numbers, and betrayed by those who promised to assist me.
Page 392 - STRONG, LOGEMAN, and WHEELER.— Introduction to the Study of the History of Language. By HERBERT A. STRONG, MA, LL.D.

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