Work Motivation: History, Theory, Research, and Practice

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SAGE, 2007 - Business & Economics - 337 pages
1 Review
'Dr. Latham's book is very detailed about under whom and where the major writers on work motivation studied. This makes for interesting asides. His footnotes are both informative and eyebrow raising. His personal journey through all this is insightful, charming, and a great contribution to understanding the lineage of psychologists. I plan on loaning to other nonpsychologists as well as assigning it to my students.'ýCANADIAN PSYCHOLOGYWork Motivation: History, Theory, Research, and Practice provides unique behavioral science frameworks for motivating employees in organizational settings. Drawing upon his experiences as a staff psychologist and consultant to organizations, author GaryŠLatham has written this book in a Űmentor voiceŲ that is highly personal and rich in examples, including enduring influences of mentors on researchers in the field.ŠŠŠ Key Features Includes anecdotes about and from the major thought leaders in the field of motivation: Personal insights from and about leading personalities in the field of motivation such as Bandura, Frese, Hough, Judge, Kanfer, Lawler, Locke, Pinder, Rousseau, and Vroom make the material come alive. Behind-the-scenes accounts of research and the researchers who conducted studies in North America, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Europe are addressed. Offers a chronological review of the research on and theories of motivation in the workplace: Written in a meaningful and memorable style, a comprehensive treatment of work motivation is given from the end of the 19th century to the present. Provides a taxonomy for the study and practice of motivation: The book explains how and why to take into account a person∆s needs, values, work setting, goals, moods, and emotions. Controversies of theoretical and practical significance such as the importance of money, the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance, and the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation are captured and resolved.ŠŠ Intended Audience:This is an excellent text for advanced undergraduate and graduate students studying work motivation in the departments of Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Organizational Behavior, and Human Resource Management.Talk to the author! http:/www.rotman.utoronto.ca/facbios/viewFac.asp'facultyID=latham
 

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Contents

19001925 Biology Behavior and Money
3
Biology
6
Behavior
9
Money
11
Concluding Comments
12
19251950 Dust Bowl Empiricism
13
Attitude Surveys
15
Laboratory Experiments
16
Personality Traits Distal Predictors of Motivation
133
Five Factor Model FFM
135
SelfRegulatorySelfMonitoring Personality
137
Core SelfEvaluations
139
Goal Orientation
141
SelfDetermination Theory
142
Concluding Comments
145
Values TransSituational Goals
149

Field Experiments
17
Hawthorne Studies
18
World War II
21
Concluding Comments
24
19501975 The Emergence of Theory
27
Job Satisfaction and Job Performance
28
Motivation Theory
29
Need Hierarchy Theory
30
Theory X and Theory Y
32
TheoryDriven Empirical Research
33
Job Characteristics
36
Equity Theory
42
Expectancy Theory
44
Behavior Modification
48
GoalSetting Theory
52
Concluding Comments
56
19752000 The Employee Is Immersed in Thought
59
GoalSetting Theory
60
Goal Limitations
63
Social Cognitive Theory
70
SelfRegulation
76
Job Characteristics Revisited
79
The HighPerformance Cycle
80
Mediators
85
Moderators
86
Performance Leads to Rewards That Affect Satisfaction
92
Satisfaction Leads to Organization Commitment
93
Principles of Organizational Justice
95
Concluding Comments
98
20thcentury Controversies
99
Intrinsic vs Extrinsic Motivation
102
Performance and Satisfaction
105
Participative Decision Making
108
Summary and Overview of the 20th Century
116
From a Practitioners Viewpoint
121
The 21st Century Examining the Present 20002005
125
Needs The Starting Point of Motivation
127
Need Hierarchy Theory
128
Socioanalytic Theory
130
Concluding Thoughts
131
Context
150
Societal Culture
151
Job Characteristics
157
PersonEnvironment Fit
161
Concluding Comments
172
Cognition Goals Feedback and SelfRegulation
175
GoalSetting Theory
176
Conscious Goals
177
Contextual Conditions
180
Implementation Intentions and Subconscious Goals
190
Feedback
198
SelfRegulation
203
Social Cognitive Theory
207
Outcome Expectancies
210
Moral Disengagement
212
Pygmalion Effect
214
Action Theory
217
Concluding Comments
219
AffectEmotion The Employee Has Feelings Too
221
Emotions and Moods
222
Principles of Organizational Justice
229
The Psychological Contract
233
Concluding Comments
237
Future Directions and Potential Misdirections
241
Boundaryless Psychology
243
Social Psychology
244
LifeSpan Research
248
Evolutionary Psychology
249
Neuroscience
251
Time
253
Computer Models
255
Teams
256
Levels of Analysis
257
Integration
258
Epilogue
263
The Art of Practice
265
References
281
Index
321
About the Author
337
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About the author (2007)

Gary Latham is the Secretary of State Professor of Organizational Effectiveness in the Rotman School School of Management at the University of Toronto.† He is a Past President of the Canadian Psychological Association, a Fellow of the Academy of Management, the American Psychological Association, American Psychological Society, Canadian Psychological Association, and the Royal Society of Canada.† He is the only person to receive both the awards for Distinguished Contribution to Psychology as a Profession and as a Science from the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology.† He is also the recipient of the Scholarly Practitioner and the Heneman Career Achievement Award from the Academy of Management Human Resource Division.† He is the co-author of A Theory of Goal Setting and Task Performance with Edwin A. Locke; and Increasing Productivity through Performance Appraisal, and Developing and Training Human Resources, both with K. N. Wexley.