Worker Alienation, 1972: Hearings, Ninety-second Congress, Second Session [on] S. 3916 ...

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Page 166 - This is why you go to the tavern. You want to release it there rather than do it at home. What does an actor do when he's got a bad movie? I got a bad movie every...
Page 11 - It's hard to take pride in a bridge you're never gonna cross, in a door you're never gonna open.
Page 21 - I gather from what you said here that you still believe there are a number of things that can be done to help to indicate to the workers that management is sensitive to this issue.
Page 161 - I'm married and I got two kids. . . . (trails off) I worked on a truck dock one time when I was single.
Page 163 - ... hours people could really expand? Who's to say? There are some people in factories just by force of circumstance. I'm just like the colored people. Potential Einsteins don't have to be white. They could be in cotton fields, they could be in factories. The twenty-hour week is a possibility today. The intellectuals, they always say there are potential Lord Byrons, Walt Whitmans, Roosevelts, Picassos working in construction or steel mills or factories. But I don't think they believe it. I think...
Page 34 - Kornhauser concludes: . . .Poorer mental health occurs whenever conditions of work and life lead to continuing frustration by failing to offer means for perceived progress toward attainment of strongly desired goals which have become indispensable elements of the individual's self-identity as a worthwhile person. Persistent failure and frustration bring lowered self-esteem and dissatisfaction with life, often accompanied by anxieties, social alienation and withdrawal, a narrowing of goals and curtailing...
Page 11 - ... we heard you in Pittsburgh not too long ago. I want to express appreciation to Senator Nelson, who is chairman of this subcommittee and very much interested in this whole problem, and it is only with his cooperation and support that we are holding this hearing this morning. This is the first hearing in the House of Representatives or the Senate of the United States on this whole subject area, and it is a very key and important concern to millions of workers in this country, and as in so many...
Page 172 - This is gonna sound square, but my kid is my imprint. He's my freedom. There's a line in one of Hemingway's books. I think it's from For Whom the Bell Tolls. They're behind the enemy lines, somewhere in Spain, and she's pregnant. She wants to stay with him. He tells her no. He says, "if you die, I die," knowing he's gonna die. But if you go, I go. Know what I mean? The mystics call it the brass bowl. Continuum. You know what I mean? This is why I work. Every time I see a young guy walk by with a...
Page 162 - Mike, you're a good worker but you have a bad attitude." My attitude is that I don't get excited about my job. I do my work but I don't say whoopee-doo. The day I get excited about my job is the day I go to a head shrinker. How are you gonna get excited about pullin' steel? How are you gonna get excited when you're tired and want to sit down? It's not just the work.
Page 170 - I have a choice of taking my wife and kids to a picnic or going to a college campus, it's gonna be the picnic. But if I worked a twenty-hour week, I could go do both. Don't you think with that extra twenty hours people could really expand? Who's to say? There are some people in factories just by force of circumstance. I'm just like the colored people. Potential Einsteins don't have to be white. They could be in cotton fields, they could be in factories.

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