Working-class Women in the Academy: Laborers in the Knowledge Factory

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Michelle M. Tokarczyk, Elizabeth A. Fay
Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1993 - Education - 335 pages
"My mother still wants me to get a 'real' job. My father, who is retired after forty-four years in the merchant marine, has never read my work. When I visited recently, the only book in his house was the telephone book." "I do not know that my mother's mother ever acknowledged my college education except to ask me once, 'How can you live so far away from your people?'. Thus write two of the twenty women from working-class backgrounds whose voices are heard in this unique collection of essays. Each of the women has lived through the process of academic socialization - as both student and teacher - and each has thought long and deeply about her experience from an explicitly feminist perspective. Among the questions the contributors explore, What are the issues - pedagogical, theoretical, and personal - that affect the professional and private lives of these women? How do they resolve tensions between their roles as middle-class professionals and their roots in working-class families? How do class and gender intersect in the academy?
 

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Contents

II
3
III
25
IV
47
V
49
VI
60
VII
73
VIII
87
IX
97
XVII
179
XVIII
197
XIX
208
XX
217
XXI
219
XXII
239
XXIII
251
XXIV
276

X
99
XI
112
XII
126
XIII
140
XIV
148
XV
163
XVI
165
XXV
292
XXVI
309
XXVII
311
XXVIII
323
XXIX
329
XXX
333
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Page 11 - Chinese- Americans, when you try to understand what things in you are Chinese, how do you separate what is peculiar to childhood, to poverty, to insanities, one family, your mother who marked your growing with stories, from what is Chinese? What is Chinese tradition and what is the movies?

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