Working Toward Whiteness: How America's Immigrants Became White

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Basic Books, Aug 8, 2006 - History - 349 pages
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At the vanguard of the study of race and labor in American history, David R. Roediger is the author of the now-classic The Wages of Whiteness, a study of racism in the development of a white working class in nineteenth-century America. In Working Toward Whiteness, he continues that history into the twentieth century. He recounts how American ethnic groups considered white today-including Jewish-, Italian-, and Polish-Americans-once occupied a confused racial status in their new country. They eventually became part of white America thanks to the nascent labor movement, New Deal reforms, and a rise in home-buying. From ethnic slurs to racially restrictive covenants--the racist real estate agreements that ensured all-white neighborhoods--Roediger explores the murky realities of race in twentieth-century America. A masterful history by an award-winning writer, Working Toward Whiteness charts the strange transformation of these new immigrants into the "white ethnics" of America today.
 

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User Review  - xenchu - LibraryThing

I just couldn't finish this book. The author wrote like he was afraid a layman would like his book and lower his status among scholars. It was filled with references and dull prose. It finally wore me down. I would not recommend this book unless you are writing a paper. Read full review

Working toward whiteness: how America's immigrants became white: the strange journey from Ellis Island to the suburbs

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

America is a country of immigrants. Roediger (history, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; TheWages of Whiteness: Race and the Making of the American Working Class ) points out that when people of ... Read full review

Contents

New Immigrants Race and Ethnicity in
3
INBETWEENNESS
57
New Immigrant Racial Consciousness
93
The Ironies
133
Finding Homes in an Era of Restriction
157
of Whiteness
235
Acknowledgments
245
Index
321
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About the author (2006)

David R. Roediger teaches on the history of race and class in the United States at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he is the Babcock Chair of History and of African American Studies. He lives in Champaign, Illinois.

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