Works, Volume 6, Page 2

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Page 24 - Katharine's first marriage. The Pope fancied that this cautiously worded decree — condemning while giving hope of a favourable result — would bring back Henry, and that ultimately some satisfactory compromise might be arrived at. Buoyed up with the hope that England and the Defender of the Faith might even yet pause ere they threw off the shackles of Rome, Clement, accompanied by his niece, and escorted by the galleys of France, set out for Marseilles, where he had appointed to meet the king....
Page 258 - It is said to have been copied from some ancient coins, and to have been appropriated as the symbol 1552-] THE CAP OF LIBERTY. 285 of freedom by Cassar's assassins. Thus singularly was brought to light by a king of the French Renaissance that terrible cap of liberty, before which the ancient Crown of France was one day destined to fall. The declaration of the German princes and that of their ally, the King of France, fell like a thunderbolt on the emperor — so great was his astonishment and consternation...
Page 353 - an eloquent and learned man," began his address by "thanking God for having brought the king thither to be present at the decision of such a cause — the cause of our Lord Jesus Christ." " The condemnation of those who, in the midst of the flames, invoke the name of Jesus Christ is not," he said, " a matter of small importance.
Page 110 - You see that fair lady, my brother ? She is of opinion that I ought not to allow you to leave Paris until you have revoked the Treaty of Madrid." " If the advice is good," replied Charles, apparently unmoved, "it should be followed.
Page 31 - ... their way, but this they said was the amount of voluntary donations, totally unsolicited by them. About fifty colliers arrived at Chester, from the neighbourhood of Wolverhampton, drawing a waggon loaded with coal, with the professed intention of obtaining relief from the benevolent inhabitants of the towns and villages through which they passed on their way to Liverpool. Information having been given to the Magistrates of that city of their approach, Aldermen Evans, Bowers, and Bedward, attended...
Page 263 - ... surprise the Emperor and his attendants in an open, defenceless town, and there to dictate conditions of peace. The dissatisfaction of a portion of the troops at not immediately receiving the usual gratuity for taking a place by assault occasioned a short delay in the advance of Maurice's army. He arrived at Innspruck in the middle of the night, and learned that the Emperor had fled only two hours before to Carinthia, followed by his ministers and attendants, on foot, on horses, in litters, as...
Page 165 - Dolet, sed pia turba dolet,' a clever jeu de mots, more concisely expressed in Latin than in either French or English. ' Dolet n'est point dolent, mais ce peuple compatissant est dolent pour lui.
Page 318 - the special gentlemen in every shire," urging them immediately to raise men for the succour of Calais, "the chief Jewell of the Realme...
Page 313 - ... mind, and certain acts of the king's ; as it is certain that the false friends who surround him are in league with those conspirators at Coblentz who were striving to lure the king on to his ruin in order to place the crown upon the head of one of their own chief conspirators; as it is needful for his personal safety as well as for the safety of the kingdom that his conduct should be above suspicion , — I suggest an address in which he be reminded of the truths I have just mentioned, and of...

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