Works: The winning of the West. 4 v

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Review of Reviews Publishing Company, 1889
 

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Page 260 - Springs fort in 1782, with perhaps one hundred souls in it was reduced in August to three fighting white men — and I can say with truth that for two or three weeks my mother's family never unclothed themselves to sleep, nor were all of them within that time at their meals together, nor was any household business attempted. Food was prepared and placed where those who chose could eat.
Page 85 - Indians were favorable to them, knowing they alone could give them supplies; and he added "the Spaniards are feeble and hated by the French, the French are fickle and have no man of capacity to advise or lead them, and the Rebels are enterprising and brave, but want resources." The bulk of the Detroit French, including all their leaders, remained staunch supporters of the crown, and the militia eagerly volunteered to go on the expedition. Feasts were held with the Ottawas, Chippewas, and...
Page 109 - Poor Myres, the express, who set out on the 15th, got killed on his passage and his packet fell into the hands of the enemy ; but I had been so much on my guard that there was not a sentence in it that could be of any disadvantage to us for the enemy to know; and there were private letters from soldiers to their friends, designedly wrote to deceive in case of such accidents. This was customary with us, as our expresses were frequently surprised.
Page 260 - It is impossible at this day to make a just impression of the sufferings of the pioneers about the period spoken of. The White Oak Spring fort in 1782, with perhaps one hundred souls in it, was reduced in August to three fighting white men — and I can say with truth, that for two or three weeks, my mother's family never unclothed themselves to sleep, nor were all of them, within the time, at their meals together, nor was any household business attempted.
Page 61 - It was written at the desire of Presidents Jefferson and Madison ; and therefore some thirty or forty years after the events of which it speaks. Valuable though it is, as the narrative of the chief actor, it would be still more valuable had it been written earlier ; it undoubtedly contains some rather serious errors.
Page 313 - Every man carried a small-bore rifle, a tomahawk, and a scalping knife. A very few of the officers had swords, and there was not a bayonet nor a tent in the army."2...
Page 109 - A few days ago I received certain intelligence of Wm. Moires my express to you being killed near the Falls of Ohio, news truly disagreeable to me, as I fear many of my letters will fall into the hands of the enemy at Detroit.
Page 71 - ... his feet uttering the unearthly war-whoop. Instantly the dancing ceased ; the women screamed, while the men ran towards the door. But Clark, standing unmoved and with unchanged face, grimly bade them continue their dancing, but to remember that they now danced under Virginia and not Great Britain.1 At the same time his men burst into the fort, and seized the French officers, including the commandant, Rocheblave.
Page 379 - Then our elder brother promised to have the line run between us agreeable to the first treaty, and all that should be found over the line should be moved off. But it is not done yet. We have done nothing to offend our elder brother since the last treaty, and why should our" elder brother want to quarrel with us ? We have sent to the governor of Virginia on the same subject. We hope that between you both, you will take pity on your younger brother, and send Colonel Sevier, who is a good man, to have...

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