World Economy Since the Wars: A Personal View

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In this ambitious, eminently readable survey, John Kenneth Galbraith exhibits unmatched insight and broad scope - from World War I and the Russian Revolution to the implications of Communism's fall, from the "superbly insane decade of the twenties" and the Great Depression to the Reagan era and beyond. Whether he is analyzing the advent of Keynesian theory or the end of colonialism and the emergent Third World, Galbraith epitomizes the hindsight and the vision of one who has been an active and outspoken participant in the world's economic history. He writes with authority about the forging of Kennedy's New Frontier and Johnson's Great Society and examines the consequences of the "unintended history of the 1980s." Keenly observed and brilliantly composed, A Journey Through Economic Time is the crowning achievement of a remarkable career, a comprehensive and accessible view of twentieth-century economic and political history that will be read and referred to for years to come.

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User Review  - the.ken.petersen - LibraryThing

Economics is not my subject so, anyone who can make it appear rational and, relatively, straight forward gets my vote. I actually felt that I was understanding this book. Although this book is ... Read full review

A JOURNEY THROUGH ECONOMIC TIME: A Firsthand View

User Review  - Kirkus

From Galbraith, now 85 and professor emeritus at Harvard, a personal, idiosyncratic, and thin history of the economics of the century. Relying mostly on ``experience, observation and reflection. And ... Read full review

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About the author (1994)

John Kenneth Galbraith is a Canadian-born American economist who is perhaps the most widely read economist in the world. He taught at Harvard from 1934-1939 and then again from 1949-1975. An adviser to President John F. Kennedy, he served from 1961 to 1963 as U.S. ambassador to India. His style and wit in writing and his frequent media appearances have contributed greatly to his fame as an economist. Galbraith believes that it is not sufficient for government to manage the level of effective demand; government must manage the market itself. Galbraith stated in American Capitalism (1952) that the market is far from competitive, and governments and labor unions must serve as "countervailing power." He believes that ultimately "producer sovereignty" takes the place of consumer sovereignty and the producer - not the consumer - becomes ruler of the marketplace.

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