World Turned Upside Down: U.S. Naval Intelligence and the Early Cold War Struggle for Germany

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Potomac Books, Inc., 2007 - History - 185 pages
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In 1955, after assignments at the U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) and on board a destroyer, Marvin Durning arrived at ONI's office in Munich, Germany. During this year, he participated in the final stages of transforming Germany from a defeated enemy into a respected democracy, reestablishing its sovereignty, and shepherding its membership in NATO, which also involved rearming America's erstwhile foe. At that time, Munich, like Berlin, was a nerve center for the Cold War. It was crowded with U.S. troops and German and Slav refugees. Radio Free Europe called it home. The city was, Durning writes, "a jungle of competing secret intelligence organizations: British, French, American, Russian, West and East German, Czech, Polish, and others." Beneath the calm surface of everyday life in Munich roamed agents and double agents who witnessed defections, kidnappings, interrogations that ended in death, and assassinations by bomb explosions and by poison dart. World Turned Upside Down is Durning's account of such activities. Durning served as the de facto executive officer of a small office of German intelligence specialists tasked with routine navy issues. But much more was underway. Known only to his commander, himself, and the yeoman who typed the reports, former admirals of the defunct German Kriegsmarine attended secret meetings at his commander's house in the suburbs of Munich, where they worked to plan and create a future West German Navy. In addition, Durning served as a liaison officer to the Gehlen Organization, the supersecret German intelligence and espionage organization, and he recounts their activities here.
 

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Contents

FOREWORD
AUTHORS NOTE
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
PROLOGUE
PART 1THE MYSTERY OFFICE IN MUNICH
1A PREDAWN DRIVE TO AIR BASE FÜRSTENFELDBRUCK
2TO GERMANY AND TO MUNICH
3VAL RYCHLY THE SKIPPER
ENEMY TO ALLY
REINHARD GEHLEN AND JAMES CRITCHFIELD
16THE ADMIRALS AND THE NEW GERMAN NAVY
SOVEREIGNTY RESTORED AND NATO
18ADENAUER VISITS MOSCOW SEPTEMBER 913 1955
19THE RETURN OF GERMAN PRISONERS OF WAR
PART 4ENDURING FRIENDSHIPS
LATER YEARS

4THE PEOPLE OF POSSART PLATZ 3
5ANOTHER INTELLIGENCE ORGANIZATION
6A HIGHLY PRODUCTIVE INTELLIGENCE OFFICE
7US NAVY VISITORS
PART 2LIFE IN MUNICH
MAXS PARTY
9MAX PARNITZKI
10HELMUTH PICH
11ERIKA MÜLLER
EAST AND WEST
13SOME VIGNETTES ABOUT GERMANY
14VISITS TO DACHAU
21VLADIMIR RYCHLY
EPILOGUE
APPENDIX AMax Parnitzkis Brief Curriculum Vitae and Experience as a Prisoner of War
APPENDIX BMax Parnitzkis Iron Cross
APPENDIX CUS Navy Letter of Recommendation for Max Parnitzki
APPENDIX DLetter from Undersecretary of Navy to Val Rychly
APPENDIX ETwo Pages from Val L Rychlys Travel Diary 1946
GLOSSARY
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

After serving in naval intelligence, Marvin B. Durning became an educator and a lawyer. He served as a naval officer during the tense years of the Cold War struggle over Germany??'s future. Durning is also an early leader in the environmental movement, and served the Carter administration as Assistant Administrator for Enforcement in the Environmental Protection Agency. He lives in Seattle.

Bibliographic information