Wrestling with the Angel of Democracy: On Being an American Citizen

Front Cover
Shambhala Publications, 2008 - History - 291 pages
This exploration of American history, emphasizing the inner lives of pivotal figures, demonstrates that ultimately democracy is not only a system of governance, but, in its fullest form, represents a revolution in consciousness--one still unfolding today. Beginning with an exploration of the life and thought of Thomas Jefferson, Griffin identifies two aspects of the American psyche: the "psychology of empire," characterized by a desire for safety, order, and control, and the "psychology of democracy," characterized by equality, empathy, and truth telling. According to Griffin, these two psychologies have been battling for supremacy from our country's earliest inception. Griffin's exploration of American history is interwoven with personal memoir exploring her upbringing and political awakenings in 1950s California. Griffin argues that the birth of American democracy signaled a fundamental shift in our most deeply held values and understandings, yet she suggests that the work of establishing democracy in this country has not been completed.--From publisher description.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Wrestling with the Angel of Democracy: On Being an American Citizen

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Griffin began her "social autobiography" with A Chorus of Stones: The Private Life of War (1992), which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, and continued with What Her Body Thought. She now delivers a ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

LIBERTY
1
YOSEMITE
53
BLUE JEANS
140
JAZZ
195
SONG OF MYSELF
229
ROUND
277
BIBLIOGRAPHY
287
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
293
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

\Susan Griffin has won dozens of awards for her work as a feminist writer, poet, essayist, playwright, and filmmaker. She is the author of more than twenty books including A Chorus of Stones, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. She is the recipient of an Emmy, a MacArthur grant, and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. She is a frequent contributor to Ms. magazine, the New York Times Book Review, and numerous other publications. She lectures widely and is a frequent guest on national and local radio programs. She lives in Berkeley, California.

Bibliographic information