Wright

Front Cover
Taschen, 2004 - Architecture - 96 pages
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The Wright idea   "The interior space itself is the reality of the building."
- Frank Lloyd Wright

Widely thought to be the greatest American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) was a true pioneer, both artistically and technically. At a time when reinforced concrete and steel were considered industrial building materials, Wright boldly made use of them to build private homes. His prairie house concept--that of a low, sprawling home based upon a simple L or T figure--was the driving force behind some of his most famous houses and became a model for rural architecture across America. Wright`s designs for office and public buildings were equally groundbreaking and unique. From Fallingwater to New York`s Guggenheim Museum, his works are among the most famous in the history of architecture.   About the Series:
Each book in TASCHEN's Basic Architecture Series features:
  • an introduction to the life and work of the architect
  • the major works in chronological order
  • information about the clients, architectural preconditions as well as construction problems and resolutions
  • a list of all the selected works and a map indicating the locations of the best and most famous buildings
  • approximately 120 illustrations (photographs, sketches, drafts and plans)
 

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Contents

II
16
III
18
IV
19
V
21
VI
23
VII
27
VIII
29
IX
31
XXIII
55
XXIV
57
XXV
59
XXVI
63
XXVII
65
XXVIII
67
XXIX
69
XXX
73

X
32
XI
33
XII
35
XIII
37
XIV
39
XV
41
XVI
43
XVII
45
XVIII
47
XIX
48
XX
49
XXI
51
XXII
53
XXXI
74
XXXII
77
XXXIII
79
XXXIV
81
XXXV
82
XXXVI
83
XXXVII
85
XXXVIII
87
XXXIX
89
XL
94
XLI
96
Copyright

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Page 7 - The Fair, Frank, is going to have a great influence in our country. The American people have seen the Classics on a grand scale for the first time. You've seen the success of the Fair and it should mean something to you too. We should take advantage of the Fair.
Page 9 - We of the Middle West," he wrote in the March 1908 issue of Architectural Record, "are living on the prairie. The prairie has a beauty of its own and we should recognize and accentuate this natural beauty, its quiet level. Hence, gently sloping roofs, low proportions, quiet sky lines, suppressed heavy-set chimneys, and sheltering overhangs, low terraces and out-reaching walls sequestering private gardens.
Page 7 - the Fair should have shown you that Sullivan and Richardson are well enough in their way, but their way won't prevail — architecture is going the other way.
Page 7 - the Fair should have shown you that Sullivan and Richardson are well enough in their way, but their way won't prevail — architecture is going the other way.
Page 9 - I loved the prairie by instinct as a great simplicity — the trees, flowers, sky itself, thrilling by contrast. I saw that a little height on the prairie was enough to look like much more — every detail as to height becoming intensely significant, breadths all falling short. Here was tremendous spaciousness but all sacrificed needlessly. All space...

About the author (2004)

Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer is Director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives at the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Taliesin West, in Scottsdale, AZ

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