Writers and Readers in Medieval Italy: Studies in the History of Written Culture

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Yale University Press, 1995 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 257 pages
In this fascinating book, one of the world's foremost authorities on writing and the social history of books discusses reading and writing in medieval Italy. Armando Petrucci addresses concerns central to paleographers and to cultural historians: how people learned to write, what they wrote, what they read, how scribes were trained, the purposes for which books were copied, and how ideas about books influenced their use, preservation, and transmission.
 

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Contents

From the Unitary Book to the Miscellany 1
1
The Christian Conception of the Book
2
in the Sixth and Seventh Centuries 19
19
The Lombard Problem 43
43
Book Handwriting and School 59
59
Literacy and Graphic Culture of Early Medieval Scribes 77
77
Symbolic Aspects of Written Evidence 103
103
Reading in the Middle Ages 132
132
Minute Autograph Authors Book 145
145
Reading and Writing Volgare in Medieval Italy 169
169
Documentary Evidence 236
236
INDEX 251
251
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Armando Petrucci occupies the chair in Latin paleography at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa. His" Public Lettering: Script, Power, and Culture "appeared in English translation in 1993.

Charles M. Radding is a professor of history at Michigan State University.

Francis Newton is a professor of classics at Duke University.

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