Writing with Sources (2nd Edition): A Guide for Students

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Hackett Publishing, Mar 1, 2008 - 96 pages
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Developed for Harvard University's Expository Writing Program, Writing with Sources describes the main principles and methods of integrating and citing sources in scholarly work, and provides cogent guidance on avoiding the misuse of sources. The second edition of Writing with Sources is updated throughout, and includes new material on the roles sources play in argument, on assessing the reliability of sources, and on attitudes about writing that can lead to plagiarism.
 

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Contents

Integrating Sources into a Paper
3
12 Rules for Quoting
8
13 Quoting Blocks
10
14 Using Discursive Notes
12
Citing Sources
14
22 When Not to Cite
16
23 Methods of Citing
17
24 Acknowledging Uncited Sources
20
Styles of Documentation
35
41b InText Style for the Humanities
37
41c InText Styles for Social Sciences and Sciences
39
41d Coding Style for the Sciences
42
42 Listing Your References
43
42a Common Sources and Variants
44
42b Other Articles and Short Texts
49
42c Other Books
51

Misuse of Sources
22
32 Other Ways of Misusing Sources
25
33 Special Hazards of Electronic Sources
28
34 Disciplinary Consequences
30

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 8 - ... not wasting time and energy on a chase whose outcome is certain. Similarly, as applied to males displaying toward females, Zahavi's theory reasons that any male that has managed to survive despite the handicap of a big tail or conspicuous song must have terrific genes in other respects. He has proved that he must be especially good at escaping predators, finding food, and resisting disease. The bigger the handicap, the more rigorous the test that he has passed. The female who selects such a male...
Page 7 - ... male is like the medieval damsel testing her knight suitors by watching them slay dragons. When she sees a one-armed knight who can still slay a dragon, she knows that she has finally found a knight with great genes. And that knight, by flaunting his handicap, is actually flaunting his superiority. It seems to me that Zahavi's theory applies to many costly or dangerous human behaviors aimed at achieving status in general or at sexual benefits in particular. For instance, men who woo women with...

About the author (2008)

Gordon Harvey is Senior Preceptor of Expository Writing, Harvard University.

Bibliographic information