Writing arguments: a rhetoric with readings

Front Cover
Macmillan College Pub. Co., 1995 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 512 pages
The market-leading guide to arguments, "Writing Arguments" has proven highly successful in teaching readers to read arguments critically and to produce effective arguments of their own. Teaches readers to write better arguments. How to write arguments; how to do research for arguments; an anthology of argumentative readings. Anyone interested in writing better arguments.

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User Review  - writingstudies - LibraryThing

A full Rhetoric of argument, including “Reading Arguments,” “Writing Arguments,” Principles of Argument,” and “The Researched Argument.” Readings include student and professional examples of different types of argumentative texts, as well as advertisements. Read full review

Contents

An Introduction
2
READING ARGUMENTS
24
Reading as a Doubter
39
Analyzing Why Disputants Disagree
41
Wrong Way to Reform WelfareDorothy Gilliam
47
To Save Their Daughter from Leukemia Abe and Mary Ayala Conceived
53
WRITING ARGUMENTS
60
The Power of Tree Diagrams
70
What Drugs I Take Is None of Your BusinessThe Consequences of Drug
261
Students Who Push BurgersWalter S Minot
267
X IsIs Not Like Y
270
Assignment Options for Chapter 12
273
Writing Your Resemblance Argument
280
X IsIs Not a Good Y
288
How to Determine Criteria for Your Argument
295
Writing Your Evaluation Argument
300

Two Sets
77
Principles of Argument
85
A Claim with
86
A CLAIM SUPPORTED
93
THE LOGICAL STRUCTURE OF ARGUMENTS
98
The Toulmin
102
Using Toulmins Schema to Determine a Strategy of Support
108
Conclusion
116
EVIDENCE IN ARGUMENT
118
The Art of Library Research
122
Choose LifeDao Do student
138
AudienceBased Reasons Ethos and Pathos
140
An Overview
147
Minneapolis Pornography OrdinanceEllen Goodman
160
Treating Opposing Views
166
Conciliatory or Rogerian Approach to Opposing
179
Writing Assignments for Chapters 5 7 and 8
185
PART III
193
X IsIs Not a Y
202
Writing Assignment for Chapter 10 Extended DefinitionBorderline
204
Conducting a CriteriaMatch Argument
210
Testing A Definitional Argument
221
X CausesDoes Not Cause Y
234
Because Clauses
238
Argue by Analogy or Precedent
247
Critiquing Causal Arguments
254
The Mandatory MotorcycleHelmet Law is Bad LawBill C Healy
307
We ShouldShould Not Do X
312
The Nature of Proposal Arguments
313
Options for Proposal
317
Using the Toulmin Schema to Develop a Proposal Argument
323
Sample Arguments
332
What Should Be Done about the Mentally III Homeless?
339
ETHICAL ARGUMENTS
352
Developing an Ethical Argument
359
PART IV
366
The Argument as a Formal Research Paper
369
Locating Library Materials
374
Using Computer Searches
381
USING AND DOCUMENTING SOURCES
388
Some General
390
Avoiding Plagiarism
403
Conclusion
417
APPENDIXES
430
An Overview of Informal Fallacies
431
Statistical Traps in Arguments
444
Working in Groups
452
Skills and Roles
455
A Classroom Debate
469
INDEX
473
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

JOHN C. BEAN is professor of English at Seattle University, where he directs the writing program and chairs the Task Force on Teaching and Learning. He is coauthor (with John D. Ramage) of Writing Arguments (3rd ed., 1995) and Form and Surprise in Composition (1986).

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