The Writings: The conflict with slavery: Politics and reform; The inner life; Criticism

Front Cover
Houghton, Mifflin, 1889
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 64 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.
Page 221 - They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick ; but go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice : for I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.
Page 266 - Such a nation might truly say to corruption, thou art my father, and to the worm, thou art my mother and my sister.
Page 381 - Ere the pruning-knife of Time Cut him down, Not a better man was found By the crier on his round Through the town. But now he walks the streets, And he looks at all he meets Sad and wan, And he shakes his feeble head, That it seems as if he said, "They are gone.
Page 11 - Yet they say, The Lord shall not see, neither shall the God of Jacob regard it.
Page 174 - They parted — ne'er to meet again ! But never either found another To free the hollow heart from paining• — . They stood aloof, the scars remaining, Like cliffs which had been rent asunder ; A dreary sea now flows between : But neither heat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly do away, I ween, The marks of that which once hath been.
Page 319 - Till it arrive at Heaven's vault, Which thence (perhaps) rebounding may Echo beyond the Mexique bay!' Thus sung they in the English boat A holy and a cheerful note: And all the way, to guide their chime, With falling oars they kept the time.
Page 261 - The oracles are dumb, No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving. Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving. No nightly trance or breathed spell Inspires the pale-eyed priest from the prophetic cell.
Page 61 - Is it not to deal thy bread to the hungry, and that thou bring the poor that are cast out to thy house? when thou seest the naked, that thou cover him; and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh?
Page 329 - IN that delightful land which is washed by the Delaware's waters, Guarding in sylvan shades the name of Penn the apostle, Stands on the banks of its beautiful stream the city he founded. There all the air is balm, and the peach is the emblem of beauty, And the streets still reecho the names of the trees of the forest, As if they fain would appease the Dryads whose haunts they molested.

Bibliographic information