Writings of the Young Marx on Philosophy and Society

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Hackett Publishing, 1997 - Philosophy - 506 pages
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The most comprehensive one-volume collection in English of Marx's writings from 1835 to 1847, Writings of the Young Marx on Philosophy and Society ranges broadly in subject - from the nature of religion to freedom of the press and to the relation of the state to democracy, from the humanistic critique of philosophical idealism to the "alienation" of humanity and to the relation of communism to historical praxis. It features Easton and Guddat's own highly regarded translations (based on the best German editions as well as on the original manuscripts and first editions) and reveals differences as well as continuities between the "young" and the "old" Marx. A substantial introduction and detailed analytical headnotes indicate the significance and historical setting of each selection, as well as its relationship to Marx's other writings. With one exception ("Defense of the Moselle Correspondent") each article, chapter, or book section is presented in its entirety, without internal deletions.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Reflections of a Youth on Choosing an Occupation
35
1837
51
From Anekdota zur neuesten deutschen Philoso
67
From the Rheinische Zeitung 184243
96
Religion Free Press and Philosophy
109
Zeitung
131
Economic Distress and Freedom of the Press
143
Introduction
249
From ExcerptNotes of 1844
265
Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts 1844
283
Critical Notes on The King of Prussia and Social
338
From The Holy Family 1844
361
From Notebooks of 184445
399
From The Poverty of Philosophy 1847
474
Index
497

Critique of Hegels Philosophy of the State 1843
151
From the DeutschFranzosische Jahrbucher
203

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About the author (1997)

Described as one of the most influential figures in human history, Karl Marx was a German philosopher and economist who wrote extensively on the benefits of socialism and the flaws of free-market capitalism. His most notable works, Das Kapital and The Communist Manifesto (the latter of which was co-authored by his collaborator Friedrich Engels), have since become two of history's most important political and economic works. Marxism--the term that has come to define the philosophical school of thought encompassing Marx's ideas about society, politics and economics--was the foundation for the socialist movements of the twentieth century, including Leninism, Stalinism, Trotskyism, and Maoism. Despite the negative reputation associated with some of these movements and with Communism in general, Marx's view of a classless socialist society was a utopian one which did not include the possibility of dictatorship. Greatly influenced by the philosopher G. W. F. Hegel, Marx wrote in radical newspapers from his young adulthood, and can also be credited with founding the philosophy of dialectical materialism. Marx died in London in 1883 at the age of 64.

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