Writings about John Cage

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Richard Kostelanetz
University of Michigan Press, Dec 15, 1993 - Music - 353 pages
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John Cage was one of the most extraordinary and intriguing composers of the twentieth century--or perhaps of any century. His vast corpus of musical compositions, writings, and performances has amazed, amused, bored, enlightened, angered, and fascinated audiences throughout the world. Despite the controversy surrounding his work, there is little disagreement about his role as one of the most important and influential members of the avant-garde.
In Writings about John Cage, the renowned Cage expert Richard Kostelanetz has collected the writings of thirty-seven prominent scholars and critics. Selections include articles by the composers Henry Cowell, Peggy Glanville-Hicks, Lou Harrison, Michael Nyman, Virgil Thomson, and Christian Wolff; by literary figures Paul Bowles, John Hollander, and Manfredi Piccolomini; by critics Daniel Charles, Jill Johnston, Edward Rothstein, Calvin Tomkins, and Peter Yates; and by performers Merce Cunningham and Paul Zukofsky. The contributions cover all aspects of Cage's life and career, including his music, his aesthetics, his prose and poetry, his visual art, and his contributions to modern dance.
Richard Kostelanetz is a poet and critic who has written and edited numerous books on aesthetics, the avant-garde, and literature, including The Avant-Garde Tradition in Literature, On Innovative Music(ian)s, The Theatre of Mixed Means, and Esthetics Contemporary. He is the author of The Old Poetries and the New, also published by the University of Michigan Press. His books on Cage include John Cage and Conversing with Cage.
". . . the most intelligently chosen book of writings about Cage that I've seen. . . . Kostelanetz is a practiced and gifted anthologist, with the discriminating eye of a litterateur, the sensibility of a poet, and the ear of a musician. . . . . [N]o matter how we read Writings about John Cage, we learn--from intelligent and serious teachers whose writings are worth the effort."--Institute for Studies in American Music Newsletter
". . . belongs in the library of anyone who is trying to understand and to deal with John Cage."--Performing Arts Journal
John Cage was one of the most extraordinary and intriguing composers of the twentieth century--or perhaps of any century. His vast corpus of musical compositions, writings, and performances has amazed, amused, bored, enlightened, angered, and fascinated audiences throughout the world. Despite the controversy surrounding his work, there is little disagreement about his role as one of the most important and influential members of the avant-garde.
In Writings about John Cage, the renowned Cage expert Richard Kostelanetz has collected the writings of thirty-seven prominent scholars and critics. Selections include articles by the composers Henry Cowell, Peggy Glanville-Hicks, Lou Harrison, Michael Nyman, Virgil Thomson, and Christian Wolff; by literary figures Paul Bowles, John Hollander, and Manfredi Piccolomini; by critics Daniel Charles, Jill Johnston, Edward Rothstein, Calvin Tomkins, and Peter Yates; and by performers Merce Cunningham and Paul Zukofsky. The contributions cover all aspects of Cage's life and career, including his music, his aesthetics, his prose and poetry, his visual art, and his contributions to modern dance.
Richard Kostelanetz is a poet and critic who has written and edited numerous books on aesthetics, the avant-garde, and literature, including The Avant-Garde Tradition in Literature, On Innovative Music(ian)s, The Theatre of Mixed Means, and Esthetics Contemporary. He is the author of The Old Poetries and the New, also published by the University of Michigan Press. His books on Cage include John Cage and Conversing with Cage.
". . . the most intelligently chosen book of writings about Cage that I've seen. . . . Kostelanetz is a practiced and gifted anthologist, with the discriminating eye of a litterateur, the sensibility of a poet, and the ear of a musician. . . . . [N]o matter how we read Writings about John Cage, we learn--from intelligent and serious teachers whose writings are worth the effort."--Institute for Studies in American Music Newsletter
". . . belongs in the library of anyone who is trying to understand and to deal with John Cage."--Performing Arts Journal

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Writings about John Cage

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This welcome collection brings together diverse and well-written articles, all previously published, about one of the most written-about composers of the 20th century. The pieces are organized ... Read full review

Contents

Imaginary Landscaper 1982
1
Counterpoint 1934
15
The Early Percussion Music of John Cage 1978
33
About John Cages Prepared Piano 1990
46
On Form 1960
58
The Abstract Composers 1952
73
Two Albums by John Cage 1960
93
DeLinearizing Musical Continuity 1990
107
Mallarme Boulez and Cage 198687
180
John Cage as a Hdrspielmacher 1989
213
Europeras 1988
243
Silence 1962
264
Cage and Fluxus 1990
279
John Cages Longest and Best Poem 1990
297
We Have Eyes as Well as Ears 1982
319
Cage and Modern Dance 1965
334

ca 1967
134
John Cages Lecture Indeterminacy 1959
162
John Cage in a New Key 1981
176
Contributors
351
Copyright

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References to this book

Modern Music and After
Paul Griffiths
No preview available - 1995
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About the author (1993)

Individual entries on Richard Kostelanetz's work in several fields appear in various editions of Readers Guide to Twentieth-Century Writers, Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature, Contemporary Poets, Contemporary Novelists, Postmodern Fiction, Webster's Dictionary of American Writers, The HarperCollins Reader's Encyclopedia of American Literature, Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Musicians, Directory of American Scholars, Who's Who in America, Who's Who in the World, Who's Who in American Art, NNDB.com, Wikipedia.com, and Britannica.com, among other distinguished directories. Otherwise, he survives in New York, where he was born, unemployed and thus overworked.

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