Writings to Young Women from Laura Ingalls Wilder: On life as a pioneer woman

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Tommy Nelson, 2006 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 116 pages
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In Writings to Young Women from Laura Ingalls Wilder: On Life As a Pioneer Woman, Laura tells her readers what it was like to be a pioneer in the early 1900s. Her stories and insights show us how difficult even the simplest chores or tasks were for the early pioneers, yet through it all she continued to see each situation as an adventure--as if she was truly blazing the trail for future generations.

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About the author (2006)

Wilder was born near Pepin, Wisconsin; attended school in DeSmet, South Dakota; and became a teacher before she was 16, teaching for seven years in Dakota Territory schools. She and her husband, Almanzo Wilder, farmed near DeSmet for about nine years and then moved to Mansfield, Missouri, where they lived out the rest of their days. Wilder did not write her first book, Little House in the Big Woods, about her early years in Wisconsin, until late in life, on the urging of her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane. It was first published in 1932. She followed this with Farmer Boy (1933), a book about her husband's childhood in New York State. She then completed a series of books about her life as she and her family moved westward along the frontier. Little House on the Prairie (1935) records the family's move to Kansas. On the Banks of Plum Creek (1937) describes the family's move to Minnesota. By the Shores of Silver Lake (1939) records the family's move to South Dakota, as do the final three books in the series: The Long Winter, Little Town on the Prairie (1941), and These Happy Golden Years (1943), which ends with her marriage to Almanzo Wilder. Three of Wilder's books were published posthumously: On the Way Home, a diary of her trip to Mansfield; The First Four Years, an unfinished book about her first four years of marriage; and West from Home, letters she wrote on a visit to her daughter in San Francisco, none of them up to the quality of her earlier books. At her best, Wilder employs a clear, simple style, a wealth of fascinating detail, and a straightforward narrative style. Her tales of a strong, traditional frontier family that endures the hardships of the late eighteenth century are seen through the eyes of a child, which endears them to young readers. Her work is possibly the best example of historical realistic fiction for children.

Stephen Hines has published both fiction and poetry but is best known as a "literary prospector" who has brought back forgotten works by famous children's author Laura Ingalls Wilder, and works by Louisa May Alcott, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. His researches have taken him from the Herbert Hoover Library in West Branch, Iowa, to correspondence with British researchers dealing with the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the United Kingdom. More than half a million copies of books he has collected and edited are in print, and he has had three bestsellers: Little House in the Ozarks, "I Remember Laura" , and The Quiet Little Woman . He continues to write fiction and poetry and has been a newspaper humor columnist for seven years.

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