Wuthering Heights, Volume 5

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Harper & Brothers, 1900 - Bronte - 557 pages
 

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engaging book, very intricate descriptions, depressing and anti-romantic

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Fabulous. Pure gossip from the early 1800s. Some may be confused by the language but if you don't like this you probably didn't give it a full try. A true classic. I read half the book in one day.

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Contents

I
1
II
7
III
18
IV
32
V
40
VI
44
VII
52
VIII
64
XXXI
310
XXXII
317
XXXIII
329
XXXIV
338
XXXV
355
XXXVI
368
XXXVII
376
XXXVIII
388

IX
75
X
93
XI
112
XII
124
XIII
139
XIV
152
XV
162
XVI
171
XVII
176
XVIII
196
XIX
207
XX
212
XXI
219
XXII
238
XXIII
245
XXIV
254
XXV
265
XXVI
270
XXVII
275
XXVIII
288
XXIX
296
XXX
303
XXXIX
398
XL
405
XLI
411
XLII
427
XLIII
430
XLIV
435
XLV
441
XLVI
456
XLVII
461
XLVIII
469
XLIX
483
L
491
LI
495
LII
506
LIII
516
LIV
520
LV
526
LVI
532
LVII
541
LVIII
545
LIX
552
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Page 451 - So then she softened down; and my heart like as it warmed towards her, an' in a bit we was very good friends. An' so it is, Miss Grey, "a soft answer turneth away wrath; but grievous words stir up anger.
Page xxiii - Never in all her life had she lingered over any task that lay before her, and she did not linger now, She sank rapidly. She made haste to leave us. Yet, while physically she perished, mentally she grew stronger than we had yet known her. Day by day, when I saw with what a front she met suffering, I looked on her with an anguish of wonder and love. I have seen nothing like it ; but, indeed, I have never seen her parallel in anything. Stronger than a man, simpler than a child, her nature stood alone.
Page 84 - I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees. My love for HeathclifF resembles the eternal rocks beneath : a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff — he's always, always in my mind — not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself — but as my own being...
Page xxxv - But hear no murmuring: it flows silently, O'er its soft bed of verdure. All is still, A balmy night ! and though the stars be dim, Yet let us think upon the vernal showers That gladden the green earth, and we shall find A pleasure in the dimness of the stars. And hark! the nightingale begins its song, 'Most musical, most melancholy
Page 84 - Heathcliff's miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning: my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger: I should...
Page 447 - God's mercy, and with a quiet conscience ; therefore if there be any of you, who by this means cannot quiet his own conscience herein, but requireth further comfort or counsel ; let him come to me, or to some other discreet and learned Minister of God's Word, and open his grief...
Page 82 - It would degrade vi 14 me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him; and that, not because he's handsome, Nelly, but because he's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.
Page 49 - I've understood from Shielders'" (that was the curate, sir) '"that he lets her grow up in absolute heathenism. But who is this? Where did she pick up this companion? Oho! I declare he is that strange acquisition my late neighbour made, in his journey to Liverpool - a little Lascar, or an American or Spanish castaway.
Page 50 - Afterwards, they dried and combed her beautiful hair, and gave her a pair of enormous slippers, and wheeled her to the fire; and I left her, as merry as she could be, dividing her food between the little dog and Skulker, whose nose she pinched as...
Page xiii - I sing her?) whose soul Knew no fellow for might, Passion, vehemence, grief, Daring, since Byron died, That world-famed son of fire — she, who sank Baffled, unknown, self-consumed; Whose too bold dying song Stirr'd, like a clarion-blast, my soul.

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