Wuthering Heights

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Smith, Elder, 1889 - Electronic books - 462 pages
Full of mystery and the supernatural, Wuthering Heights was a tremendous success for Emily Brontė upon its publication. The novel tells the story of several romances between characters who find themselves living in or paying visits to a remote estate called Wuthering Heights. This volume also includes Anne Brontė's Ag.
 

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this is the book bella read in twilight! iv'e read a few pages but they were comlacated. they are talking like they did a long time ago. :)

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Page 375 - A soft answer turneth away wrath : but grievous words stir up anger.
Page 295 - I lingered round them, under that benign sky; watched the moths fluttering among the heath, and hare-bells; listened to the soft wind breathing through the grass; and wondered how any one could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth.
Page 372 - God's mercy, and with a quiet conscience ; therefore if there be any of you, who by this means cannot quiet his own conscience herein, but requireth further comfort or counsel ; let him come to me, or to some other discreet and learned Minister of God's Word, and open his grief...
Page 38 - As it spoke, I discerned, obscurely, a child's face looking through the window. Terror made me cruel; and, finding it useless to attempt shaking the creature off, I pulled its wrist on to the broken pane, and rubbed it to and fro till the blood ran down and soaked the bedclothes: still it wailed, "Let me in!
Page x - MS.," and, instead, he took out of the envelope a letter of two pages. He read it trembling. It declined, indeed, to publish that tale, for business reasons, but it discussed its merits and demerits so courteously, so considerately, in a spirit so rational, with a discrimination so enlightened, that this very refusal cheered the author better than a vulgarly-expressed acceptance would have done. It was added, that a work in three volumes would meet with careful attention.
Page 56 - Both of us were able to look in by standing on the basement, and clinging to the ledge, and we saw - ah! it was beautiful - a splendid place carpeted with crimson, and crimson-covered chairs and tables, and a pure white ceiling bordered by gold, a shower of glass-drops hanging in silver chains from the centre, and shimmering with little soft tapers.
Page 85 - I cannot express it ; but surely you and everybody have a notion that there is or should be an existence of yours beyond you. What were the use of my creation if I were entirely contained here ? My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff's miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning ; my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished and he remained I should still continue to be ; and if all else remained and he were annihilated the universe would turn to a mighty...
Page xviii - Be the work grim or glorious, dread or divine, you have little choice left but quiescent adoption. As for you - the nominal artist - your share in it has been to work passively under dictates you neither delivered nor could question - that would not be uttered at your prayer, nor suppressed nor changed at your caprice.
Page 257 - When I sat in the house with Hareton, it seemed that on going out I should meet her; when I walked on the moors I should meet her coming in. When I went from home I hastened to return; she MUST be somewhere at the Heights, I was certain! And when I slept in her chamber - I was beaten out of that. I couldn't lie there; for the moment I closed my eyes, she was either outside the window, or sliding back the panels, or entering the room, or even resting her darling head on the same pillow as she did...
Page 85 - My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff 's miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning: my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger: I should not seem a part of it.

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