Wuthering Heights in Plain and Simple English (Includes Study Guide, Complete Unabridged Book, Historical Context, Biography And

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BookCaps Study Guides, Dec 10, 2012 - Reference
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 Emily Brontė’s “Wuthering Heights” is considered one of the greatest novels ever wrote. It also can be difficult to understand--it is loaded with themes, imagery, and symbols. If you need a little help understanding it, let BookCaps help with this study guide.


Along with chapter-by-chapter summaries and analysis, this book features the full text of Brontė's classic novel is also included.


BookCap Study Guides are not meant to be purchased as alternatives to reading the book.

 

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The best novel i ever read. Emily bronte is really a very good writer. I just love her novels. This novels brings alot of happiness.

Contents

Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Chapter 21
Chapter 22
Chapter 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 33
Chapter 34
Brontė Family Biography
The Brontė Family
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER2
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER7 CHAPTER8 CHAPTER 9 CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 15
CHAPTER16 CHAPTER17 CHAPTER 18 CHAPTER 19
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Emily Bronte, the sister of Charlotte, shared the same isolated childhood on the Yorkshire moors. Emily, however, seems to have been much more affected by the eerie desolation of the moors than was Charlotte. Her one novel, Wuthering Heights (1847), draws much of its power from its setting in that desolate landscape. Emily's work is also marked by a passionate intensity that is sometimes overpowering. According to English poet and critic Matthew Arnold, "for passion, vehemence, and grief she had no equal since Byron." This passion is evident in the poetry she contributed to the collection (Poems by Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell) published by the Bronte sisters in 1846 under male pseudonyms in response to the prejudices of the time. Her passion reached far force, however, in her novel, Wuthering Heights. Bronte's novel defies easy classification. It is certainly a story of love, but just as certainly it is not a "love story". It is a psychological novel, but is so filled with hints of the supernatural and mystical that the reader is unsure of how much control the characters have over their own actions. It may seem to be a study of right and wrong, but is actually a study of good and evil. Above all, it is a novel of power and fierce intensity that has gripped readers for more than 100 years.

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