XML for Data Architects: Designing for Reuse and Integration

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Morgan Kaufmann, Jul 3, 2003 - Computers - 272 pages
"The book addresses a sorely missing set of considerations in the real world... This is a very timely book."
-Peter Herzum, author of Business Component Factory and CEO of Herzum Software

XML is a tremendous enabler for platform agnostic data and metadata exchanges. However, there are no clear processes and techniques specifically focused on the engineering of XML structures to support reuse and integration simplicity, which are of particular importance in the age of application integration and Web services. This book describes the challenges of using XML in a manner that promotes simplification of integration, and a high degree of schema reuse. It also describes the syntactical capabilities of XML and XML Schemas, and the similarities (and in some cases limitations) of XML DTDs. This book presents combinations of architectural and design approaches to using XML as well as numerous syntactical and working examples.

* Designed to be read three different ways: skim the margin notes for quick information, or use tables in the appendix to locate sections relevant the to a particular issue, or read cover-to-cover for the in-depth treatment.
* Contains numerous tables that describe datatypes supported by the most common DBMSs and map to XML Schema supported data types.
* Unique focus on the value added role and processes of the data architect as they apply to enterprise use of XML.
 

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Contents

Motivation and Rationale for Using XML
7
SelfDescribing
11
Interoperable
16
Reusable
19
Flexible
22
Extensible
23
XML Document Types
27
DocumentOriented Content
31
White Space
123
Vertical Models
129
Horizontal Models
131
Component Models
134
Hybrid Models
137
Rigid Container Forms
144
Abstract Container Forms
148
Hybrid Container Forms
154

TransactionOriented Content
33
External to the Enterprise Web
36
internal to the Enterprise EAI and lntranet
39
MessageOriented Content
42
Choosing a Type of Schema
45
The Importance of Naming Standards Taxonomy
49
Taxonomy Characteristics
50
Name Particles
52
Name Character Case
54
Name Particle Separators
55
Name Length
58
Name Specificity
59
Traditional Approaches to Data Element Naming
63
Alternative Taxonomies for XML
66
W3C XML Schema vs Database Data Types
69
Basic W3C XML Schema Data Types
72
Alignment with Relational Database Product Data Types
73
W3C XML Schema Data Types to IBM DB2 UDB 7 Data Types
74
W3C XML Schema Data Types to Oracle 9 Data Types
75
W3C XML Schema Data Types to SQL Server Data Types
76
W3C XML Schema Basic Date and Time Data Types
78
W3C XML Schema Basic lnteger Types
79
W3C XML Schema Basic Decimal Data Types
80
W3C XML Schema Basic Boolean Data Types
81
W3C XML Schema Basic URl Data Types
82
Using Identifiers
83
W3C XML Schema Data Type Facets
112
Character Length
113
Value Limits Minimum and Maximum Thresholds
116
Digits Number of and Type
117
Enumeration Allowable and Valid Values
120
Patterns
122
Internal W3C XML Schema Reuse
167
External W3C XML Schema Reuse Component Subschemas
175
An Architectural Approach to Reuse Engineering
178
Syntax for Referencing a Component W3C XML Schema
191
The Design and Engineering Process
197
Responsibilities of the Data Architect
201
The Challenges of Complexity
204
Structural and Navigational Complexity
205
Document Size
209
Derived and Redundant
210
Web Services An Introduction to the Future
216
XML and Web Services
219
UDDIUniversal Description Discovery and Integration
221
SOAPSimple Object Access Protocol
223
Why Would a Company Develop and Publish Web Services?
226
The Future of Web Services
229
Schema Types
233
Data Types
235
Facets
236
Structure Models
238
Architectural Container Forms
239
Reuse
240
Design Techniques
242
Web Services
243
W3C XML Schema Syntax Examples
244
W3C XML Schema complexType Syntax Locally Declared
245
W3C XML Schema group Syntax Globally Declared
246
W3C XML Schema simpleType Syntax Globally Declared Enumeration List
247
Glossary
248
Bibliography and Recommended Reading
256
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

James Bean is the President and CEO of the Relational Logistics Group. He is the author of the books: the "Sybase Client/Server EXplorer" 1996 Coriolis Group Books and "XML Globalization and Best Practices" 2001, and has written numerous magazine articles for technology journals. He is also the Chairman of the Global Web Architecture Group.

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