Y: The Hyperbola of the World Order

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University Press of America, 2007 - History - 395 pages
2 Reviews
Combining history, archaeology, sociology, political science, and agricultural studies, Y=Arctg X: The Hyperbola of the World Order presents a theory claiming that any political system with a firm agricultural foundation is pre-destined to reach political unity and turn this state into the norm. Using the circumscription theory the idea that the phenomenon of political unification was most explicit in areas of the world where agricultural land was in short supply and exhaustive historical evidence, this timely work proposes the emergence of a single world state."
 

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Once in a century we get formula as "E = mc square", or "Y = Arctg X" (where X is time and Y percentage of the world surface under single center) which explains so much phenomena with such elegance.
Einstein never attempted historical theory, explaining that history has too many variables. Ostrovsky detected in the multitude of variables a dominant overall trend.
I avoid more details (there is a detailed overview in Wikipedia).
The bottom line: It is a mega-theory unseen in social sciences: world-wide grasp, penetrating analysis, superhuman outwork, scientific approach, bold execution. The future project is completely weird, but I want to see it does not happen that way.
Despite the above, the book was not written just to awe experts and humiliate think-tanks; it is entirely comprehensible for all level readers.
 

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Gt.bctbchzMmmuftthdn b.

Selected pages

Contents

Egypt and Mesopotamia
3
China and the Mediterranean
21
DISCUSSION
33
Circumscription
35
China and the Mediterranean
38
Summary
51
Cereal Agriculture
54
Warfare as the Mechanism of Unification
55
The Present Stage
176
The Cocooned States
199
Hegemony
220
8 The Next Stage
240
Chin
252
The United States
265
Summary
287
Imperialization and Modern Circumstances
294

Agriculture as the Source of Warfare
60
The Foundation of Empire
73
Summary
89
The Imperial Belt
93
IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MODERN SYSTEM
109
The Formation
111
Circumscription
126
The End of the Balance of Power
140
The Pattern of Imperialization
314
9 Forward to the Future
339
Conclusion
355
Abbreviations
369
Cited Bibliography
371
About the Author
395
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Max Ostrovsky is a Ph.D. candidate and Librarian at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

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