Y Traethodydd: am y fleyddyn ...

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Argraffwyd a Chyhoeddwyd Gan T. Gee a'i Fab, 1865 - Theology
 

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Page 92 - He spake; and, to confirm his words, out-flew Millions of flaming swords, drawn from the thighs Of mighty Cherubim ; the sudden blaze Far round illumined Hell. Highly they raged Against the Highest, and fierce with grasped arms Clashed on their sounding shields the din of war, Hurling defiance toward the vault of Heaven.
Page 23 - He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
Page 436 - His life was gentle, and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man!
Page 284 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade.
Page 262 - Daniel the Prophet: Nine Lectures delivered in the Divinity School of the University of Oxford. With copious Notes. By the Rev. EB PUSEY, DD, Regius Professor of Hebrew, Canon of Christ Church, Oxford.
Page 89 - If once they hear that voice, their liveliest pledge Of hope in fears and dangers, heard so oft In worst extremes, and on the perilous edge Of battle when it raged, in all assaults Their surest signal, they will soon resume New courage and revive, though now they lie Grovelling and prostrate on yon lake of fire, 280 As we erewhile, astounded and amazed, No wonder, fallen such a pernicious height.
Page 85 - Extort from me. To bow and sue for grace With suppliant knee, and deify his power, Who from the terror of this arm so late Doubted his empire; that were low indeed, That were an ignominy...
Page 488 - It was with the deepest regret that the executive found the duty of employing the war power in defence of the government forced upon him. He could but perform this duty or surrender the existence of the government. No compromise by public servants could, in this case, be a cure ; not that compromises are not often proper, but that no popular government can long survive a marked precedent that those who carry an election can only save the government from immediate destruction by giving up the main...
Page 12 - Rhoddwyd i mi bob awdurdod yn y nef ас ar y ddaear; ewch gan hyny a dysgwch yr holl genedloedd, gan eu bedyddio hwy yn enw y Tad, a'r Mab, a'r Ysbryd Glān; gan ddysgu iddynt gadw pob peth ar a orchymynais i chwi; ac wele, yr ydwyf fi gyda chwi bob amser hyd ddiwedd y byd?
Page 386 - I do at a time when every angry passion has passed away, I cannot help expressing our obligations to him for the labour he has, at no small personal sacrifice, bestowed upon a measure which he — not the least among the apostles of Free Trade — believes to be one of the most memorable triumphs Free Trade has ever achieved.

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