Yellow Wolf, His Own Story

Front Cover
Caxton Press, 2008 - History - 365 pages
"Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press"
The Nez Perce campaign is among the most famous in the brief and bloody history of the Indian wars of the West.a Yellow Wolf was a contemporary of Chief Joseph and a leader among his own men.a His story is one that had never been told and will never be told again.a A first person account, through author L.V. McWhorter of the Nez Perce's ill-fated battle for land and freedom. "
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wesh - LibraryThing

A cogent timeline synthesis of nearly thirty years of interviews with one of the major surviving Native American fighters of the Nez Perce War. Supporting and dissenting views are offered where ... Read full review

Contents

Youth of the Warrior
24
General Howard Shows the Rifle
34
Battle of the White Bird Canyon
54
Annihilation of Rainss Scouting Party
67
Fight with Captain Randalls Volunteers and Its Sequel
75
Battle of the Clearwater
85
Indian Withdrawal from the Clearwater
95
Across the Lolo Trail and into Montana
102
The Last Stand Bears Paw Battlefield
210
The Last Day The Surrender
220
Flight to the Sioux
229
Turning Back to the Old Home
238
A Sanguinary Trail
248
Soldiers Against Indians
260
A Voluntary Surrender
274
Eeikish Pah The Hot Place
283

At the Big Hole Surprise Attack
112
At the Big Hole Savagery of the Whites
128
Closing Scenes at the Big Hole
148
From the Big Hole to Camas Meadows
161
Into Yellowstone National Park
170
The Canyon Creek Fight
181
Northward Across the Missouri
195
Fortyeight Hours from Freedom
203
Wyakin Powers
295
Yellow Wolfs War Club and War Whistle
300
Henry Tabador
303
Report of Captain William Falck
306
Chief Red Hearts Band
310
Bibliography
313
Glossary
317
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 27 - ... Upon being asked how he came by the designation of Yellow Wolf, the warrior discoursed earnestly for some moments with interpreter Hart, and then gave this explanation: I was a boy of about thirteen snows when my parents sent me away into the hills. It was to find my Wyakin. I saw something—not on the ground, but about four feet up in the air. I took my bow and shot an arrow. It was in moon you call May when my parents again sent me out. This time it was to the wildest part of the mountains....

About the author (2008)

Lucullus Virgil McWhorter was born in 1860 ina log cabin in what is now West Virginia. From his earliest childhood, he was interested in everything pertaining to Indians. After moving west McWhorter took on the task of writing about the history of the native tribes of the Northwest and battling against the injustices visited upon them by the American government. L.V. McWhorter died in 1944.

Bibliographic information