Yellow-cap, and Other Fairy-stories for Children

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Longmans, Green, 1880 - Children's stories - 285 pages
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Page 155 - Listen to me then,' said Tom, ' and all may yet be well. But in the first place get on my back, so that I may take you out of this desert, and into the great forest, where we can lay our plans without being interrupted.' So saying Tom rose and curved his back : the two children jumped upon it ; off they all went, and, in less time than it takes to tell it, they were in the midst of that great Forest of Mystery which they had so often seen from the window of their chamber, but which, until now, they...
Page 131 - ... and fasten down their eyelids, they would see stars, white, blue, and red, twinkling in the sky overhead ; and below, amongst the gloomy shadows of the trees, other yellow stars which danced about and flitted to and fro. These flitting stars were supposed by grownup people to be will-o'-the-wisps, jack-o'-lanterns, fire-flies, and glowworms. But the three children knew them to be the torches borne by the elves, as they capered hither and thither about their affairs. For although the Forest of...
Page 189 - ... courtyard, and writhed along the passages and up the staircases, until (in less time than it takes to write about it) the Ivy had reached the room with the hundred and one corners. In the midst of this room stood Rumpty-Dudget, having fled to it for safety ; for it was defended by enchantments which only the Golden Ivy could have overcome. There he stood, trembling in his shoes, as well he might; and in all the corners round about, with their faces to the wall and their hands behind their backs,...
Page 183 - He has done nothing but eat sugar-candy and blow on a tin whistle ever since he went there ; and he says he wants nothing better than to stay with Rumpty-Dudget all his life. And, by the way, he asked me to tell you if I saw you that he hoped you and your sister would come and join ; for that Rumpty-Dudget is the pleasantest fellow in the world, and not at all like what you had been made to believe him.
Page 185 - ... stir.' Harold saw that by stretching about six inches further, he could reach a faggot. But, in order to stretch six inches, he would be obliged to put the other foot outside the circle. ' After all, what can it matter?' he thought. And the next moment there he was, outside ! Immediately, with a loud laugh, the dwarf flung away the faggots far into the depths of the forest ; and rushing into the circle, he began to stamp out with his feet what was left of the enchanted fire. Then Harold recognised...
Page 166 - ... her own way as can the Queen of the Air Spirits. Now, Princess Hilda, if you will sit down here on my throne I will let you be Queen of the Air Spirits instead of me. You shall have everything your own way, and you shall put on as many airs as you please. Come ! ' When Hilda heard this she certainly felt for a moment very much tempted to do as the Queen asked her. But the next moment the thought came to her of her poor little brother Hector, standing in the hundred-andfirst corner of Rumpty-Dudget's...
Page 171 - Hilda had nestled down in his soft white fur and clasped her arms round his neck, he began scratching at the hole with both his fore-paws, and throwing up the dirt in a mighty heap behind ; till in a wonderfully short time a large passage was made, opening towards the centre of the earth. ' Hold fast ! ' said Tom again, and into the passage they went. If it had not been for the cat's eyes, which shone like two yellow carriage-lamps, they might more than once have missed their way, for it was as dark...
Page 282 - Oh, she has gone into her shell ; it is late — she must be asleep by this time,' answered Oscar. ' You must wait until tomorrow.' ' That won't do ! ' said Kanker. ' The agreement was for this evening. If you back out, you become my servant.' ' It shall be this evening, then,' replied Oscar ; ' but you will regret it more than I ! ' And stooping over the vase, he called, ' Theeda ! Theeda ! wake up ! come out ! ' They waited a moment. There was no movement in the great pearl shell, and Theeda did...
Page 147 - ... the Forest of Mystery to her home far away on the other side. Then she would shake her head, and say, ' While those spots are on your faces you cannot come with me.' ' Why not ? ' the children asked in their dream. ' Because they are a sign that a part of each of you belongs to Rumpty-Dudget ; and he will not let go of that part, in spite of all that I can do.' ' Shall we never be able to go with you, then ? ' dreamed the children piteously. ' Not until the wind blows from the south every day...
Page 146 - ... Harold's nose, and on Hector's chin, became blacker and blacker and hotter and hotter, until the children were ready to cry from pain and vexation. But tears could do no more than soap and water to wash the spots away. As soon as the wind began to blow from the south, however, the spots began to lose their blackness, and the pricking to lessen, until at last the children almost forgot their trouble. Yet it never altogether disappeared ; and neither Tom the Cat nor the Fairy Aunt had the power...

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