The Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, Volume 6

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The Association, 1881 - Yorkshire (England)
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Page 351 - I build, it were not only to excess, but even to folly, having already houses moderate for my condition in Yorkshire : — but his majesty will justify me, that at my last being in England, I acquainted him with a purpose I had to build him a house at the Naas, it being uncomely his majesty should not have one here of his own, capable to lodge him with moderate conveniency (which in truth as yet he hath not), in ease he might be pleased sometimes hereafter to look upon this kingdom...
Page 349 - exceeding comely and beautiful, and yet much more lovely in the endowments of her mind.
Page 199 - Twixt soul and body a divorce, It could not sever man and wife, Because they both lived but one life. Peace, good reader, do not weep; Peace, the lovers are asleep. They, sweet turtles, folded lie In the last knot that love could tie.
Page 397 - Fekham by view arid livery of their foresters, which was not in their power ; the king for the weal of his soul and the souls of his ancestors...
Page 351 - ... and that it was necessary in a manner, for the dignity of this place, and the health of his deputy and family, that there should be one removing house of fresh air, for want whereof, I assure your lordship, I have felt no small inconvenience since my coming hither ; that when it was built, if liked by his majesty, it should be his, paying me as it cost, if disliked, a suo damno, I was content to keep it and smart for my folly.
Page 270 - You know we can boast that the first Grand Lodge ever held in England was held in this city, where Edwin, the first Christian king of Northumbria, about the six hundredth year after Christ, and who laid the foundation of our Cathedral, sat as Grand Master.
Page 271 - Lyon's Translation, p. 160. * Findel, ibid. laid the foundation of our cathedral, sat as Grand Master. This is sufficient to make us dispute the superiority with the lodges at London. But as nought of that kind ought to be...
Page 375 - The first night we lodged at cousin Rodes's, at Great Houghton ; was pleased with the pictures of some eminent statesmen in Queen Elizabeth's time, and family pieces, originals, of the Earl of Stratford, Sir Edward Rodes, and was glad of some letters from that nobleman to the Countess* (Sir Edward's sister, daughter of Sir Godfrey).
Page 187 - He was a member of the Assembly of Divines in 1643; and in 1645 he was appointed to the charge of St Magnus', near London Bridge.
Page 351 - ... that he would give him warning when to strike by stretching forth his hands : and then he laid his neck on the block stretching forth his hands. The executioner struck off his head at one blow ; then took the head up in his hands and showed it to all the people and said, ' God save the king !' " Thus perished a victim to political and religious violence, the malevolence of an oligarchy, and, we must add, the weakness of a king ; — as great a statesman and as noble a man as ever England produced....

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