Young Man's Benefit: The Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Sickness Insurance in the United States and Canada, 1860-1929

Front Cover
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Mar 10, 1999 - Business & Economics - 184 pages
1 Review
Using cliometric methods and records from six grand-lodge archives, A Young Man's Benefit rejects the conventional wisdom about friendly societies and sickness insurance, arguing that IOOF lodges were financially sound institutions, were more efficient than commercial insurers, and met a market demand headed by young men who lacked alternatives to market insurance, not older men who had an above-average risk of sickness disability. Emery and Emery show that many young men joined the Odd Fellows for sickness insurance and quit the society once self-insurance - savings - or family insurance - secondary incomes from older children - made it feasible for them. The older men, who valued the social benefits of membership and did not need the sick benefit, gradually became a majority and dismantled the IOOF's insurance provisions.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Prologue
3
the IOOFS Market
26
The IOOFS Benefit System 18631931
47
The Financial Soundness of the Lodges 18901929
64
Competition in the IOOFS Insurance Market
93
Epilogue
117
The Percentage of Ontario Members in Arrears for Dues
130
1OOF Financial Statistics
133
F Technical Details for the Calculation of the Hazard
148
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1999)

University of Western Ontario

University of Calgary