Young Killers: The Challenge of Juvenile Homicide

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SAGE, 1999 - Psychology - 299 pages
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In Young Killers Kathleen M. Heide, a criminologist and a licensed mental health professional, blends compelling case studies with a scientific study of male adolescent murderers. This book explores more than a dozen factors that have contributed to the rise of juvenile homicide since the mid 1980s. These factors often interact with certain personality characteristics and biological influences, causing many youths to conclude that they have little or nothing to lose by engaging in reckless and destructive acts. Although this book focuses mainly on boys who kill, Dr. Heide also discusses the increasing number of girls arrested for murder and examines gender issues in juvenile homicide. Professor Heide addresses the legal response to juvenile murders, psychological assessment, treatment issues, and prevention strategies aimed at reducing the incidence of juvenile homicide.
 

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Contents

Clinical Portraits
87
The Challenge of Juvenile Homicide
219
Reducing Youth Violence in the 21st Century
239
Notes
255
References
267
Index
289
About the Author
299
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About the author (1999)

Dr. Heide is a Full Professor in the Department of Criminology at the University of South Florida, Tampa and is an internationally recognized consultant on adolescent homicide and family violence. She is a licensed mental health counselor in the State of Florida and has been court-appointed as an expert in Florida Circuit Courts in homicide, sexual battery, juvenile, and family matters. Dr. Heide's publication record includes more than 100 publications and presentations in the areas of adolescent homicide, family violence, personality assessment, and juvenile justice, along with two books - Why Kids Kill Parents (1992) and Young Killers (1999). She received her B.A. from Vassar College in Psychology and her M.A. and Ph.D in Criminal Justice from the State University of New York at Albany.

 

 

 

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