Your Problems and Mine in the Guidance of Youth: A Casebook for Teachers and Parents

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Public School Publishing Company, 1922 - Teenagers - 274 pages
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Page 255 - ... suggestion he puts them in harmony with himself? Does not his very presence suggest the right attitude in the boy ? It is not a difficult thing to come to a boy's confidence at this period of his life, and it is an enjoyable companionship to live near him ; in fact, to know him is but to enjoy him. Several years ago I heard Edward Everett Hale preach a sermon. His theme was the enjoyment of God. He said that the answer to the first question in the old catechism had never been improved upon :...
Page 253 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page 47 - Leaving lower animals aside, and turning to human instincts, we see the law of transiency corroborated on the widest scale by the alternation of different interests and passions as human life goes on. With the child, life is all play and fairy-tales and learning the external properties of • things'; with the youth, it is bodily exercises of a more systematic sort, novels of the real world, boon-fellowship and song, friendship and love, nature, travel and adventure, science and philosophy...
Page 47 - ... corresponding influx of emotional vitality may objectify itself in many different ways. With some it may result merely in greater physical activity. With others it gives an impulse to intellectual work ; with still others it leads to social and altruistic activity. A love affair, poetry, religious or political fanaticism, bizarre actions, general perversity and insanity are all possible outlets. The whole subject is most complicated. It involves the most profound questions of life and heredity....
Page 47 - This is manifested by the rapid growth at this period, by increased power of resisting disease, by the greater mental activity, and the like. The great evolution of energy and the corresponding influx of emotional vitality may objectify itself in many different ways. With some it may result merely in greater physical activity. With others it gives an impulse to intellectual work ; with still others it leads to social and altruistic activity. A love affair, poetry, religious or political fanaticism,...
Page 47 - With the child, life is all play and fairytales and learning the external properties of 'things ;' with the youth it is bodily exercises of a more systematic sort, novels of the real world, boon- fellowship and song, friendship and love, nature, travel and adventure, science and philosophy : with the man, ambition and policy, acquisitiveness, responsibility to others, and the selfish zest of the battle of life. If a boy grows up alone at the age of games and sports, and learns neither to play ball,...
Page 218 - ... against the glass and being ruined* for want of growing space. These should have been transplanted to other beds where the glass was high above, that they might have room to reach upward. Just so with boys; not only must they each be carefully tended, but at the proper time for each individual boy he must be transplanted, that his development may not be retarded and that he may not lose interest in the work of the grades above him. The plant that presses too long against the pane is distorted...
Page 218 - ... time for each individual boy he must be transplanted, that his development may not be retarded and that he may not lose interest in the work of the grades above him. The plant that presses too long against the pane is distorted and loses its value. Is not the same true of the boy ? Give the slow boy time without upbraiding him; keep close to him that he may not lose faith in himself. Do not lose him because he is not developing just as you think he should; give him time, hold on to him. A teacher...
Page 53 - Puberty is the first really dangerous period in the life of both sexes as regards the occurrence of insanity ; but it is not nearly so dangerous as the period of adolescence, a few years afterwards, when the body, as well as the functions of reproduction, has more fully developed.
Page 218 - ... education and wrongs no one. Teachers often object to this plan because they fail to see the difference in the mental grasp of this boy and of the other boys. I once visited a greenhouse where the glass was low down over the beds. A number of varieties of plants we're growing in these beds ; the seed of all had been planted at the same time; but some had outgrown others and were pressing against the glass and being ruined for want of growing space. These should have been transplanted to other...

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