Ystervarkrivier: A Slice of Life

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Jacana Media, 2012 - Fiction - 190 pages
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A delightful collection of humorous stories, this book is set in the mythical village of Ystervarkrivier—ystervark means "porcupine" in Afrikaans—a forgotten outpost of the Drakeniqua Municipality, somewhere in South Africa. The central motif is the nine-hole golf course built by a displaced Yorkshireman, Harry Corkaby. The stories detail Harry’s attempts to understand South Africa in the postapartheid years and to make money for his retirement by encouraging people to play on his folly. The action is contemporary, reflecting recent events such as Tiger’s divorce, the 2010 soccer World Cup, and South African politics, but the setting is timeless: a pastoral South Africa with little racial tension. The rural setting allows incursions by such oddities as a one-eyed ostrich, a Sangoma by the name of Dr. Mamba, and the eponymous porcupine.
 

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Contents

A Slice of Life
3
Irons Woods and Winged Victory
10
An Angel in a Khaki Loincloth
18
A Tear in the Koeksister Dough
26
A Brief History of Ystervarkrivier Part One
34
Sbus Blues
51
Lilly of the Valley
59
The Whisky Priest
67
When the Deep Purple Falls
112
WeddingDay Blues
120
A Dance to the Music of Compromise
129
Call Dr Mamba
137
Scent of a Politician
145
A Brief History of Ystervarkrivier Part Three
153
Chetty Chetty Bang Bang
164
Get a Grip
172

Below Zero
75
In the Land of the Blind Beware the OneEyed Ostrich
83
What a Tangled Nest we Weave
91
A Brief History of Ystervarkrivier Part Two
99
Epilogue
181
Acknowledgements
189
Back Cover
194
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About the author (2012)

Andy Capostagno is a broadcaster with more than 26 years of experience. He is a former employee of BBC Radio Bristol and is best known for his television commentary work on rugby and cricket for SuperSport. Dr. Jack is illustrator Jack Swanepoel, whose work has appeared in publications from Farmer’s Weekly to the Mail & Guardian.

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