Zadig and L'Ingénu

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Penguin UK, Apr 27, 2006 - Fiction - 192 pages
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One of Voltaire's earliest tales, Zadig is set in the exotic East and is told in the comic spirit of Candide; L'Ingenu, written after Candide, is a darker tale in which an American Indian records his impressions of France
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
ZADIG
EPISTLE DEDICATORY FROM SADI TO THE SULTANA SHERAAThe eighteenth day of the month Schewal in the year 837 of the Hejira
CHAPTER 1 BLIND IN ONE EYE
CHAPTER 2THE NOSE
CHAPTER 3 THE DOG AND THE HORSE
CHAPTER 4 GREEN EYES
CHAPTER 19 THE RIDDLES
LINGÉNU
CHAPTER 2THE CHILD OF NATURE IS RECOGNIZED BY HIS RELATIVES
CHAPTER 3 THE CONVERSION OF THE CHILD OF NATURE
CHAPTER 4 THE CHILD OF NATURE BAPTIZED
CHAPTER 5THE CHILD OF NATURE IN LOVE
CHAPTER 6 THE CHILD OF NATURE RUSHES TO HIS MISTRESS AND BECOMES ENRAGED
CHAPTER 7 THE CHILD OF NATURE REPELS THE ENGLISH

CHAPTER 5THE CONTEST IN GENEROSITY
CHAPTER 6 THE MINISTER
CHAPTER 7 DISPUTES AND AUDIENCE
CHAPTER 8JEALOUSY
CHAPTER 9 THE BEATEN WOMAN
CHAPTER 10 SLAVERY
CHAPTER 11 THE FUNERAL PYRE
CHAPTER 12THE SUPPER PARTY
CHAPTER 13 THE ASSIGNATIONS
CHAPTER 14THE BRIGAND
CHAPTER 15THE FISHERMAN
CHAPTER 16THE COCKATRICE
CHAPTER 17 THE TOURNAMENT
CHAPTER 18THE HERMIT
CHAPTER 8 THE CHILD OF NATURE GOES TO COURT AND ON THE WAY HAS SUPPER WITH SOME HUGUENOTS
CHAPTER 9 THE ARRIVAL OF THE CHILD OF NATURE AT VERSAILLES AND HIS RECEPTION AT COURT
CHAPTER 10 THE CHILD OF NATURE IMPRISONED IN THE BASTILLE WITH A JANSENIST
CHAPTER 11THE CHILD OF NATURE DEVELOPS HIS TALENTS
CHAPTER 12THE CHILD OF NATURES OPINIONS ON PLAYS
CHAPTER 13 THE LOVELY ST YVES GOES TO VERSAILLES
CHAPTER 14 THE CHILD OF NATURES INTELLECTUAL PROGRESS
CHAPTER 15 THE LOVELY ST YVES RESISTS CERTAIN DELICATE PROPOSITIONS
CHAPTER 16 SHE CONSULTS A JESUIT
CHAPTER 17 HER VIRTUE HER DOWNFALL
CHAPTER 18 SHE DELIVERS HER LOVER AND A JANSENIST
CHAPTER 19 THE CHILD OF NATURE THE LOVELY ST YVES AND THEIR RELATIVES ARE REUNITED
CHAPTER 20THE DEATH OF THE LOVELY ST YVES AND ITS CONSEQUENCES
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About the author (2006)

François-Marie Arouet, writing under the pseudonym Voltaire, was born in 1694 into a Parisian bourgeois family. Educated by Jesuits, he was an excellent pupil but one quickly enraged by dogma. An early rift with his father--who wished him to study law--led to his choice of letters as a career. Insinuating himself into court circles, he became notorious for lampoons on leading notables and was twice imprisoned in the Bastille. By his mid-thirties his literary activities precipitated a four-year exile in England where he won the praise of Swift and Pope for his political tracts. His publication, three years later in France, of Lettres philosophiques sur les Anglais (1733)--an attack on French Church and State--forced him to flee again. For twenty years Voltaire lived chiefly away from Paris. In this, his most prolific period, he wrote such satirical tales as "Zadig" (1747) and "Candide" (1759). His old age at Ferney, outside Geneva, was made bright by his adopted daughter, "Belle et Bonne," and marked by his intercessions in behalf of victims of political injustice. Sharp-witted and lean in his white wig, impatient with all appropriate rituals, he died in Paris in 1778--the foremost French author of his day.

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