Zoographies: The Question of the Animal from Heidegger to Derrida

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Columbia University Press, Jun 5, 2008 - Philosophy - 184 pages
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Zoographies challenges the anthropocentrism of the Continental philosophical tradition and advances the position that, while some distinctions are valid, humans and animals are best viewed as part of an ontological whole. Matthew Calarco draws on ethological and evolutionary evidence and the work of Heidegger, who called for a radicalized responsibility toward all forms of life. He also turns to Levinas, who raised questions about the nature and scope of ethics; Agamben, who held the "anthropological machine" responsible for the horrors of the twentieth century; and Derrida, who initiated a nonanthropocentric ethics. Calarco concludes with a call for the abolition of classical versions of the human-animal distinction and asks that we devise new ways of thinking about and living with animals.

 

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User Review  - karl.steel - LibraryThing

Been a few months since I finished it, but I remember enough to highly recommend it for anyone doing work in animal theory. Unlike Acampora's Corporeal Compassion, Calarco really gets Agamben; unlike ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
1
15
2
55
3
79
4
103
Notes
151
Index
163
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About the author (2008)

Matthew Calarco is assistant professor of philosophy at California State University, Fullerton. His books include On Levinas; Animal Philosophy: Essential Readings in Continental Thought; and The Continental Ethics Reader.

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