a discourse concerning the devotions of the Church of Rome, especially, as compared with those of the Church of England, in which it is shewn, that ... there is not so true devotion among them ... as in the church established by law among us

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Printed for B. Tooke, 1685 - Religion - 67 pages
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Page 52 - ... will not deprive a man of the grace and favour of God, or make up one mortal sin, and for the pardon of which there is no need or occasion for the mercy of God...
Page 31 - ... but we know not to what purpose canonization is. If it be only to recommend their virtues to example, the canonization of them will signify no more than the bare history of their good lives, faithfully recorded, would do ; but if it be in order to praying to them, we utterly condemn it. And it is too plain that this is the end of their being canonized ; for from that time solemn prayer and invocation is allowed and offered up to them. And this I believe hath been an occasion of their falling...
Page 26 - ... be easily made to appear, that they have generally been gotten by unjust and unlawful, or at best by harsh and cruel means, and such as one would not expect from the successor of St. Peter. But I concern myself with smaller and more private benefactions and gifts, though these are so considerable, that generally a third part, often half, the lands of a country are the propriety of the church. Now all this is gotten chiefly from men that are dying, who can keep their riches no longer, and therefore...
Page 43 - ... words of our Saviour, should ever pretend to supererogate. But supposing their doctrine to be true in these points, they cannot be thought to advance devotion, but rather hinder it : for seeing it is somewhat natural for a man to love his own ease, every one will be apt to argue with himself, that so many have merited already, that there is no need of what he can do. Nay, it is folly for him to attempt it ; for what need he endeavour to add to a stock of merit, which is already infinite, as some...
Page 34 - ... the rules and orders of their Church, which give so much liberty, that a man must have a very cross-grained appetite, or be in the highest degree sensual, not to be willing to comply with it. We find then no fault with fasting being enjoined, and at set seasons ; for we ourselves commend and practise it ; but let it not be to play tricks, but for true and real mortification, and for the proper ends of mortification, to humble the body to the soul, and to bring the mind to a better temper ; and...
Page 59 - Cover us. 31 For if they do thefe things in a green tree, what [hall be done in the dry ? 32 And there were alfo two other malefactors led with him to be put to death.
Page 46 - ... such a man, let him be as bad as he will ; but to make him holy first, and then to make him happy : and to pray any otherwise for another man, naturally tends to represent it as feasible to reconcile a wicked life with the hopes of heaven ; but when a man is dead, he can work no more, nor make any use of the means of grace, and therefore there is no room for this prayer to God for him ; he is not capable of repentance and glory and amendment, and of being made fit for heaven. Lastly, If they...
Page 27 - ... is there so much given to the church and charity ; and nowhere is the estate of the church engrossed into so few hands, to maintain grandeur, rather than to be a relief to poverty. For the cardinals, above seventy in number, are maintained out of the church revenues, and yet are by their creation equal to kings, and superior to princes. Now if this be charity to have a prodigious revenue for the maintenance of the church and poor, and yet to employ this to the luxury of a few, and to let the...
Page 46 - ... instruments in punishing the souls there ? for the devils are not : and how the pope, by his indulgences, can. apply the satisfactions of Christ, and of the saints, so as to deliver any soul out of purgatory ? And if there be such a place, the pope himself, by his example, doth enough to dishearten all men from endeavouring to deliver the souls of their friends from thence : for it is not doubted but he can deliver all out of purgatory, he having the command of the treasure of the church. And...
Page 5 - ... dedicated to the worship of God, besides their charitable assistance and relief which they afford to the bodies of the living, and the souls of the dead ; and no man can deny but charity is a certain evidence, as well as a great branch and duty of true religion and devotion. 3. Sometimes they glory in the great number of saints commemorated in their church, and dying in the communion of it, and urge them as a forcible example to others, and a mighty incentive to devotion ; they think also it...

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