e-Government and Web Directory: U.S. Federal Government Online 2009

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Peggy Garvin
Bernan Press, Sep 21, 2009 - Political Science - 714 pages
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Discover the breadth and depth of government information and services available online. The e-Government and Web Directory: U.S. Federal Government Online (formerly the United States Government Internet Manual) serves as a guide to the changing landscape of government information online. The Directory is an indispensable guidebook for anyone who is looking for official U.S. government resources on the Web. The U.S. government's information online is massive and can be difficult to locate. The Directory: _ contains more than 2,000 Web site records, organized into 20 subject-themed chapters _ provides descriptions and URLs for each site _ describes sites to help you choose the proper resource _ provides Web site descriptions _ includes information about the sponsoring agency _ notes the useful or unique aspects of the site _ lists some of the major government publications hosted on the site. _ evaluates the most important and frequently sought sites _ provides a roster of congressional members with membersO Web sites _ lists House and Senate Committees with committee URLs and the names of chairpersons and ranking minority members _ includes a one-page OOQuick GuideOO to the major federal agencies and the leading online library, data source, and finding aid sites _ identifies the major government Web sites related to the global recession and new government economic recovery programs _ highlights the Freedom of Information Act Web pages to access U.S. federal executive agency records Multiple indexes in the back of the book help you locate Web sites by agency, site name, subject, and government publication title. The Master Index combines the agency, site name, and subject indexes. A separate index lists Web sites with full or substantial Spanish-language versions. The subject-based approach of this book allows you to browse for relevant sites in your field of interest rather than sift through hundreds of search results or try to guess which federal agency to consult. Researchers, business people, teachers, students, and citizens in the United States and around the world can navigate the labyrinthine federal Web with this book, e-Government and Web Directory.
 

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Contents

GuideToGovWebSites
ix
preface
xi
AboutTheEditor
xiii
introduction
xv
HowToUseBook
xx
WhatCanBeFound
xxi
WhatToWatchFor
xxiii
EcoRecoWebSites
xxv
chapter 10
227
chapter 11
245
chapter 12
287
chapter 13
321
chapter 14
373
chapter 15
393
chapter 16
429
chapter 17
441

FreeOfInfoActWeb
xxix
OrganizationCharts
xxxiii
chapter 1
1
chapter 2
7
chapter 3
25
chapter 4
65
chapter 5
101
chapter 6
151
chapter 7
161
chapter 8
197
chapter 9
213
chapter 18
449
chapter 19
485
chapter 20
507
appendix a
521
appendix b
537
Site Name Index
543
Publication Index
581
Spanish Web Index
611
Master Index
615
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Peggy Garvin is an information consultant and the editor of e-Government and Web Directory: U.S. Federal Government Online, published by Bernan Press. She writes on the topic of government information online for Searcher magazine and for the LLRX.com online magazine, and is also author of Real World Research Skills, published by TheCapitol.Net. Peggy has trained librarians, public policy analysts, U.S. congressional staff, and other Washington professionals on using government Internet resources. With over 20 years of experience, her career includes work in reference and electronic resource management with both the Library of Congress Congressional Research Service and the private sector in Washington, D.C. Peggy is past chair of the Government Information Division of the Special Libraries Association and is a member of the American Libraries Association and the Association of Independent Information Professionals. She earned her bachelor of arts degree in American History from the University of Virginia and her master of library science degree from the Syracuse University School of Information Studies.

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