Poetical Works, Volume 1

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Bell & Daldy, 1871
 

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Page 259 - God, whose thunder shakes the sky, Whose eye this atom globe surveys ; To Thee, my only rock, I fly, Thy mercy in thy justice praise. The mystic mazes of thy will, The shadows of celestial light, Are past the power of human skill — But what the Eternal acts is right...
Page lxxxi - This is the last Will and Testament of me Thomas Chatterton, of the city of Bristol; being sound in body, or it is the fault of my last surgeon; the soundness of my mind, the Coroner and Jury are to be judges of, desiring them to take notice, that the most perfect Masters of Human Nature in Bristol distinguish me by the title of the Mad Genius...
Page 341 - I promised, before my departure, to write to some hundreds, I believe; but, what with writing for publications, and going to places of public diversion, which is as absolutely necessary to me as food, I find but little time to write to you. As to Mr. Barrett, Mr. Catcott, Mr. Burgum, &c. &c. they rate literary lumber so low, that I believe an author, in their estimation, must be poor indeed ! But here, matters are otherwise ; had Rowley been a Londoner, instead of a Bristowyan, I could have lived...
Page 197 - Then lost and conquer'd by superior force, Through hot Arabia holds its rapid course ; — On Tiber's banks, where scarlet jasmines bloom, And purple aloes shed a rich perfume ; Where, when the sun is melting in his heat, The reeking tigers find a cool retreat — Bask in the sedges, lose the sultry beam, And wanton with their shadows in the stream...
Page 261 - ... thy justice fear ! If in this bosom aught but Thee Encroaching sought a boundless sway, Omniscience could the danger see, And Mercy look the cause away. Then, why, my soul, dost thou complain? Why drooping seek the dark recess ? Shake off the melancholy chain, For God created all to bless. But ah ! my breast is human still; The rising sigh, the falling tear, My languid vitals' feeble rill, The sickness of my soul declare.
Page 251 - Oh, how oft shall he On faith and changed gods complain, and seas Rough with black winds and storms Unwonted shall admire, Who now enjoys thee credulous...
Page 268 - TO THE MEMORY OF THOMAS CHATTERTON; Reader judge not ; if thou art a Christian — believe that he shall be judged by a superior power — to that power alone is he now answerable.
Page lxxxv - But the Devil of the matter is, there is no money to be got on this side of the question. Interest is on the other side. But he is a poor author who cannot write on both sides.
Page 340 - Miss Rumsey, if she comes to London, would do well as an old acquaintance, to send me her address. — London is not Bristol. — We may patrole the town for a day, without raising one whisper, or nod of scandal. — If she refuses, the curse of all antiquated virgins light on her : may she be refused when she shall request...
Page 267 - Item. — If, after my death, which will happen to-morrow night before eight o'clock, being the Feast of the Resurrection, the coroner and jury bring it in lunacy, I will and direct that Paul Farr, Esq., and Mr. John Flower, at their joint expense, cause my body to be interred in the tomb of my fathers, and raise the monument over my body to the height of four feet five inches, placing the present flat stone on the top, and adding six tablets.

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